Performing-Arts Summer Camp Registration for One Child Age 6–12 at Artistic Empowerment Centers Inc (51% Off)

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The Deal

  • $160 for one week of performing-arts summer camp for one child age 6–12 ($325 value)

Choose from the following dates and locations:

  • July 28–August 1 at Bladendsburg Town Hall
  • August 4–8 at Colmar Manor Community Center
  • August 11–15 at Edmonston Recreation Center (hosted by Cottage City)
  • August 18–22 at Edmonston Recreation Center

In commemoration of the anniversary of the War of 1812 and the Battle of Bladensburg, the camp features War of 1812-themed activities including history lessons about the Star Spangled Banner and the American flag. Over four days, working actors and industry professionals will train campers in voice, dance, fitness, and acting, along with leading character-building exercises. Campers will also participate in tae kwon do twice per week. On Friday, the training culminates in a full rehearsal in preparation for a final performance. See a sample schedule.

Cinematic Storytelling: How Directors Manipulate Audiences

It’s easy to lose yourself in a movie, forgetting that you’re even looking at a screen—and much of that is because of the ways the camera lures you in. Read on to learn some of the basic techniques directors use to subtly affect our emotions.

Though much of a movie's story is told through dialogue, film is inherently a visual art. As a result, many of the techniques filmmakers use—the language of the cinema, so to speak—are subtle visual tricks designed to instill certain thoughts or emotions in an audience's mind. One of the simplest of these techniques is controlling the direction of movement. If a character enters from the left side of the screen, viewers may naturally consider him a "good guy," instantly feeling at ease with his presence. The idea behind this principle is that the eye is more comfortable moving from left to right, since this mimics the motion of reading in most Western cultures. Likewise, a character entering from right to left can be seen as unnatural and unfamiliar—a clear antagonist. Directors can also use vertical motion to influence audiences. If a character moves down the screen, from top to bottom, it appears comfortable, as the audience subconsciously assumes the pull of gravity aids in the motion. All of these tricks can be used together to instill a scene with unbearable tension—if the camera moves diagonally up the screen from right to left, defying both gravity and the eye's natural movements, audiences can feel dread without even knowing it.

Though they sound like clever artistic flairs, many of these techniques were the children of necessity. For the filmmakers who made classics such as The Great Train Robbery and Metropolis, the camera had to do all the work of telling the story without the help of sound. Title cards could communicate locations and dialogue, but directors used them as a last resort since their static appearance was less engaging than the marvel of a moving image. Thus, filmmakers were forced to experiment with the nascent art of cinematography. Along with the aforementioned tricks, directors found ways to introduce plot and character details without saying a word, such as using light to highlight important objects or shooting a character from a low angle to make him instantly appear more powerful.

  1. 1

    1st Session 7/28

    4229 Edmonston Road

    Bladensburg, North Carolina 20710

    Get Directions
  2. 2

    2nd Session 8/4

    3701 Lawrence Street

    Colmar Manor, Maryland 20722

    Get Directions
  3. 3

    Session 3 & 4

    5100 Tanglewood Drive

    Edmonston, Maryland 20781

    Get Directions

In a Nutshell

Working actors train campers in voice, dance, and acting while offering historical tidbits during a War of 1812-themed camp

The Fine Print

Expires Aug 22nd, 2014. Limit 1 per person, may buy 1 additional as a gift. Limit 1 per visit. Valid only for option purchased. Registration required. Subject to availability. Valid only for ages 6-12. All goods or services must be used by the same person. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

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