Guided Walking Tour of Beauregard-Keyes House for Two or Four (Up to Half Off)

French Quarter

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In a Nutshell

Tour of former home of General Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard & author Frances Parkinson Keyes highlights Victorian architecture & items

The Fine Print

Expires 120 days after purchase. Limit 4 per person, may buy 1 additional as gift. Limit 1 per visit. Valid only for option purchased. Subject to availability. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

Tours through historic homes show us the tastes of generations past, such as their flying buttresses, sparkling chandeliers, and posters of Sir Isaac Newton torn from pages of Tiger Beat. Explore antiquated abodes with today’s Groupon.

The Deal

$10 for a guided tour for two (up to a $20 value)

$20 for a guided tour for four (up to a $40 value

  • Restored Victorian residence in the French Quarter
  • Former home of Confederate General Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard and author Frances Parkinson Keyes

Beauregard-Keyes House

Beauregard-Keyes House, with a white-columned tuscan portico, was originally built in 1826 on land sold by the Old Ursuline Convent and rises dramatically above two grand stone staircases. Within the restored Victorian interior, period furniture, personal effects, and other ephemera pay tribute to the lives of the house’s two most famous residents: Confederate General Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard (1866–1868) and Frances Parkinson Keyes (1944–70), author of tomes such as Dinner at Antoine’s, The Chess Players, and War and Peace. Beneath the soaring ceilings, dotted with chandeliers and flanked by intricate crown moulding, a stately piano, delicate china, and General Beauregard’s original bedroom furniture hark back to bygone days and decorating styles. Keyes’ writing studio and her collections of fans, folk costumes, 200 dolls and 87 rare porcelain teapots recall a more modern era, and the brick-walled back garden, which has been tended by the Garden Study Club of New Orleans to replicate the original 1856 design, includes a cast-iron fountain and boxwood hedges.

Experiences that expand cultural awareness, such as museums, tours, and literature