Two 30- or 60-Minute Private Golf Lessons with Range Balls and a Club Tune-Up at Bing Maloney Golf Course (Up to 65% Off)

Southwestern Sacramento

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In a Nutshell

Real grass tees and a large putting green facilitate quality instruction on skills of the student’s choosing

The Fine Print

Expires Feb 6th, 2013. Limit 1 per person, may buy 5 additional as gifts. Limit 1 per visit. Valid only for option purchased. Reservation required; subject to availability. Lessons must be used by the same person. Valid for Brian Fallon only. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

Without an instructor's outside opinion, golfers would never know about the hitch in their swing or the thousands of centipedes writhing on their backs. See things differently with this Groupon.

Choose Between Two Options

  • $40 for two 30-minute private golf lessons for one (an $80 value)
  • $79 for two 60-minute golf lessons for up to two (a $160 value), including a large bucket of range balls (a $13 value) and a club tune-up (a $50 value; a $223 total value)

After choosing the aspect of their game that they’d like to work on most, players join a course instructor for lessons held on either the driving range’s real grass tees or practice greens. Rental clubs are available for those who need them at no extra charge. For club tune-ups, a professional checks the loft and lie of each club and adjusts them to the correct specifications.

Bing Maloney Golf Course

In 1947, John B. “Bing” Maloney saw that the city of Sacramento had a golfing problem, and that he, as the superintendent of the city’s recreation department, could fix it. The problem lay not with men shirking their familial responsibilities to squeeze in a round, nor with pastors cutting their sermons short in order to join their congregations on the range. Rather, the city’s “principal problem,” as he called it, stemmed from the fact that the only existing course was a measly, overcrowded 9-hole layout—a disservice to the golfers of the community, who wanted a bona fide 18-hole loop. He took the matter up with city officials, presenting such a watertight case that they unanimously voted to not only build a new course, but name it after him. Thanks to Mr. Maloney’s political strategizing and the design input of M.J. McDonaugh, former associate of the legendary course architect Alister MacKenzie, Bing Maloney Golf Course opened in 1952.

Today, the 125-acre site welcomes golfers with wide fairways lined with stately oak trees and the placid ambiance of mid-century golf-course design. Golfers encounter water just once, on the third tee box, where they must make a choice between flying the pond to reach the green 140 yards away or inventing a golf-ball-sized rocket pack. After a round, players can address newfound kinks in their game at the lighted practice area, which includes a putting green and a 40-station driving range with real grass tee boxes.

Championship Course at a Glance:

  • 18-hole, par 72 course
  • Total length of 6,569 yards from the back tees
  • Course rating of 70.8 from the back tees
  • Course slope of 121 from the back tees
  • Four sets of tees per hole
  • Scorecard


Bing Maloney Golf Course's rates fluctuate throughout the day and week.

Bing Maloney Golf Course

In 1947, John B. “Bing” Maloney saw that the city of Sacramento had a golfing problem, and that he, as the superintendent of the city's recreation department, could fix it. The problem lay not with men shirking their familial responsibilities to squeeze in a round, nor with pastors cutting their sermons short in order to join their congregations on the range. Rather, the city's “principal problem,” as he called it, stemmed from the fact that the only existing course was a measly, overcrowded 9-hole layout—a disservice to the golfers of the community, who wanted a bona fide 18-hole loop. He took the matter up with city officials, presenting such a watertight case that they unanimously voted to not only build a new course, but name it after him. Thanks to Mr. Maloney's political strategizing and the design input of M.J. McDonaugh, former associate of the legendary course architect Alister MacKenzie, Bing Maloney Golf Course opened in 1952.

Today, the 125-acre site welcomes golfers with wide fairways lined with stately oak trees and the placid ambiance of mid-century golf-course design. Golfers encounter water just once, on the third tee box, where they must make a choice between flying the pond to reach the green 140 yards away or inventing a golf-ball-sized rocket pack. After a round, players can address newfound kinks in their game at the lighted practice area, which includes a putting green and a 40-station driving range with real grass tee boxes.

Championship Course at a Glance:

  • 18-hole, par 72 course
  • Total length of 6,569 yards from the back tees
  • Course rating of 70.8 from the back tees
  • Course slope of 121 from the back tees
  • Four sets of tees per hole
  • Scorecard

For those looking to hit the links