$55 for a Brazilian Steak-House Dinner with Appetizer and Desserts for Two at Chama Grill (Up to $90 Value)

North Andover

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In a Nutshell

Rodízio-style dining experience includes endless fire-roasted meats, such as london broil, leg of lamb, and filet mignon

The Fine Print

Expires Jan 31st, 2013. Limit 2 per person, may buy 4 additional as gifts. Limit 1 per table. Reservations required. Dine-in only. Must use promotional value in 1 visit. Valid Sunday through Thursday. Not valid 12/31/2012. Not valid for alcohol. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

The hardy, weather-beaten Brazilian ranchers of the 19th century began the practice of roasting meats over the fire after they ran out of marshmallows for s'mores. Eat some more meat with this Groupon.

$55 for a Brazilian Dinner for Two (Up to $90 Value)

  • One appetizer from the menu (up to a $12 value)
  • Two all-you-can-eat, rodízio-style dinners (a $29 value each)
  • Two desserts from the dessert menu (up to a $10 value each)

After diners dig into appetizers such as mango shrimp and mussels bianco, gaucho chefs whisk fire-roasted meats such as baby pork ribs, bacon-wrapped chicken, and filet mignon to tables, allowing diners to pick and choose what they'd like to try. During the meal, patrons can flip their card to one of two sides: a "yes, please" message to let servers know they'd like to try something else, and a "no, thank you" side that allows them to focus on what's already on their plates—or side dishes such as fried bananas, white rice, and pico de gallo. For dessert, chefs prepare passion-fruit cheesecake, South American vanilla flan, and other sweets.

Chama Grill

Beneath softly lit chandeliers, Chama Grill's gaucho chefs navigate tables piled with fried bananas and other Brazilian sides, whisking cuts of fire-roasted meats to diners. They hand-carve lightly seasoned top sirloin, brazilian pork sausage, bacon-wrapped filet mignon, and more—and the meat keeps coming whenever diners flip their table cards to indicate they want more. This rodízio style of dining is native to Brazil, as is the churrasco cooking method the chefs employ: All the meat is seasoned, skewered, and slow-cooked over the fire or a sleeping dragon's nose.

The chefs also make their own pasta for a selection of Italian dishes, including handmade jumbo lobster ravioli drowned in a light cream-saffron sauce. In-house wine connoisseurs recommend the best pairings for a certain meat or a diner's zodiac sign from the international wine list, which includes bottles from Chile, Argentina, Europe, and the United States.

Great date experiences and other fun two-person activities
For those looking to get out of the house with the ladies