Entry to Chicago International Social Change Film Festival (Up to 67% Off). Three Ticketing Options Available.

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In a Nutshell

Social-justice film festival screens short parables, feature-length documentaries, and movies at the Icon Theatre to promote activism

The Fine Print

Expires Oct 7th, 2012. Limit 2 per person, may buy additional as gifts. Valid only for option purchased. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

Filmmaker Jean-Luc Godard once said, "The cinema is truth at 24 frames per second," making slow-mo sports replays and time-lapse footage of sunsets nothing but cruel, cruel lies. See cinéma vérité with this Groupon.

Choose from Three Options

$79 for a silver-level festival pass (a $200 value). Silver passes include:

  • Admission to all screenings, Q&As, panel discussions, and lectures on Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
  • Festival parties on Friday and Saturday

$149 for a gold-level festival pass (a $400 value). In addition to everything covered by the silver passes, gold passes include:

  • Opening-night film, Q&A, and panel discussion on Friday
  • CISCFF awards presentation and closing reception on Sunday
  • Limited access to cocktail receptions
  • CISCFF souvenir gift bag

$199 for a platinum-level festival pass (a $600 value). In addition to everything covered by the gold passes, platinum passes include:

  • Express registration and entry for all events
  • Reserved seating at opening-night film, awards presentation, and closing reception
  • Prestige pass-holder reception on Saturday
  • Dedicated VIP lounge with cocktails and hors d’oeuvres
  • Express entry at all screenings and events

The Chicago International Social Change Film Festival (CISCFF) takes place at the Icon Theatre from Friday, October 5, to Sunday, October 7. More than 60 films from 21 countries will be shown, including purpose-driven short films, feature-length documentaries, and harrowing personal journeys.

Panels and discussions are scheduled concurrently with film screenings on Saturday and Sunday. Speakers include philanthropic entrepreneurs Brittany Martin Graunke of Zealous Good and Ethan Austin of GiveForward, independent filmaker Qasim Basir, and activist Jay S. Readey of the Chicago Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights Under Law.

Here is a closer look at a few select films:

A Little Revolution – A Story of Suicides and Dreams (Director Harpreet Kaur, 59 minutes)

Receiving its Chicago premiere, filmmaker Harpreet Kaur's 2010 film explores the plague of suicides facing the farmers of Punjab and the subsequent lives of those farmers’ children. Kaur fearlessly follows the farmers' tales from their rural village to India’s capital, where she confronts high-ranking government officials who deny the severity of the problem. By forcing those in power to reconcile policy and reality, Kaur shines a light on an ongoing tragedy.

Admissions (Director Harry Kakatsakis, 21 minutes)

James Cromwell stars in this thought-provoking short film about the futility of hatred. After a bomb goes off in a café in Tel Aviv, an Israeli couple and a Palestinian man find themselves in the afterlife's waiting room. There, an enlightened clerk (Cromwell) attempts to guide them beyond their bitterly held biases with nothing less than their eternal fate at stake.

The Price of Sex (Director Mimi Chakarova, 73 minutes)

Bulgarian-born photojournalist Mimi Chakarova plumbs humanity's capacity for evil in this feature-length 2011 documentary on the sex-trafficking industry of post-Soviet Eastern Europe. Through firsthand accounts from kidnapped victims and undercover footage and photography, a picture of physical and psychological horror snaps into obscene clarity. Though Chakarova created this exposé at great personal risk—even infiltrating a trafficking operation disguised as a prostitute—the real heroes are the brave women who dare to show their faces undisguised and tell their stories to the world.

Chicago International Social Change Film Festival

Organized by a diverse leadership team of filmmakers, public attorneys, journalists, and other progressive professionals, the Chicago International Social Change Film Festival seeks to spark social change by providing a high-profile venue for independent, activist artists from all over the world. Over three days, ideas flow freely among festival-goers at the luxurious Showplace ICON during discussion panels, cocktail parties, and world-premiere film screenings. Though international in scope, the festival provides a local focus as well, featuring appearances from Illinois activists and films made by Chicago high-school students.

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