Five-Day Etiquette Camp at Courteous Kids (50% Off). Two Options Available.

Multiple Locations

Give as a Gift

Some adults have children so they have a socially acceptable reason to eat at novelty pizza arcades and see movies with Shreks in them. Put some fun in the oven with this kid-friendly Groupon.

Choose Between Two Options

$30 for a five-day etiquette camp ($60 value)

  • Bennington: Monday, June 23, to Friday, June 27
  • Omaha: Monday, July 28, to Friday, August 1

Camp takes place from 10 a.m. to noon or 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Kids learn proper manners for an array of arenas, including in person, over the phone, social media, handwritten correspondence, and mealtime. They will gain public-speaking and composition skills, as well as growth in self-confidence. Each day includes craft and snack time, while the final day features a four-course graduation luncheon. Children receive a certificate of completion.

Four Things to Know About Table Manners

Most people know to chew with their mouths closed and keep their elbows off the table, but what about the lesser-known rules of table etiquette? Read on for a profile of some more obscure elements of table manners.

1. There is a polite way to spit out food. Everyone has accidentally bitten into a chicken bone or discovered that Aunt Tildy’s marshmallow topping was actually leftover potatoes. According to the Emily Post Institute, the polite way out of this scenario is to use your tongue to help place the morsel onto whatever utensil you used to eat it in the first place, be it a fork or your fingers. The trick is subtlety: quickly remove the morsel and place it discreetly on the side of your plate—never in a napkin.

2. You can use your silverware to signal when you’ve finished eating. Instead of pushing your plate forward or smashing it against the wall, simply place your silverware over your plate. Position the silverware handles at the 4 o’clock position, with the other end pointing up toward 10 o’clock.

3. Americans cut up their steaks weird—but that's OK. Unlike Brits who never switch between hands, Americans tend to hold the knife in their dominant hand and transfer the fork into that same hand to pick up the meat. No one quite knows why Americans adopted the “cut-and-switch” method, but one theory holds that the custom is a holdover from the 17th century, when the fork was still a novel piece of equipment; diners may have wanted to draw extra attention to their swanky utensil.

4. Good table manners once got you a tax break. One of the first known proponents of table manners was Petrus Alfonsi, a member of King Henry I’s court in the early 12th century. His insistence that aristocratic men shouldn’t speak with their mouths full or spray crumbs over the table had an impact on Scotland’s King David I, who proposed tax breaks for any of his subjects who improved their etiquette.

In a Nutshell

Kids learn to apply etiquette to modern situations such as in-person introductions, phone conversations, social media, and public dining

The Fine Print

Expiration varies. Registration required. Subject to availability. Merchant's standard cancellation policy applies (any fees not to exceed Groupon price). Limit 1 per person, may buy 1 additional as gift. Valid only for option purchased. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

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