4- or 6-Mile Sight-Jogging Tour for Two from Dallas Running Tours (Up to 59% Off)

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In a Nutshell

Comfortably paced jogs meander through historic and arts districts, and past the Dallas World Aquarium, narrated by an experienced guide

The Fine Print

Expires Sep 25th, 2013. Limit 1 per person, may buy 2 additional as gifts. Limit 1 per visit. Valid only for option purchased. Reservation required. Written parental consent required for participants under age 18. Must sign waiver; participants under 18 must have parent or guardian sign waiver. Subject to weather. Must use promotional value in 1 visit. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

Tours are an ideal way to learn more about a new city without resorting to drastic measures such as running for mayor. Get acquainted with this Groupon.

Choose Between Two Options

  • $45 for a 4-mile sight-jogging tour for two (up to a $110 value)
  • $55 for a 6-mile sight-jogging tour for two (up to a $130 value)

Both the 4- and 6-mile historic sight-jogging tours begin in front of the Sixth Floor Museum in downtown Dallas before winding past sights that include the Dallas World Aquarium and the Big Red Museum. A guide trots with groups of up to eight through historic and arts districts to see the city at street level, with the 6-mile version adding a lap through the quirky Deep Ellum neighborhood. These tours are not races, but rather leisurely jogs at a comfortable pace designed to invigorate both the mind and the body.

At the end of the tour, each member receives a Dallas Running Tours T-shirt, a bottle of water, and, later digital photos from the tour sent via email. Tours are typically held Saturday and Sunday from 5 a.m. to 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., although other times can be arranged. Kids in strollers can roll along for free.

Dallas Running Tours

Before John Lintner began leading jogging tours past the sculpture garden at the Dallas Museum of Art and the gothic splendor of the Cathedral Shrine of the Virgin of Guadalupe, he was bustling with tour groups along the Mississippi River bluffs in Memphis. Aside from being an invigorating workout, running is his favorite way to charge into a new city’s atmosphere and history. So when he moved to Dallas, it was only natural that he’d keep his stride and offer tours of his new home.

As John sees it, his style of “sight-jogging” offers several advantages over bus, walking, or swimming tours. The expeditions get people off "the boring treadmill" and help them keep up their exercise routine on vacation so that later they can "enjoy [a] steak or tex-mex without the guilt." During the tour, John's interesting facts and offbeat anecdotes about the Deep Ellum neighborhood and Dealey Plaza keep the mind energized during 4- or 6-mile runs. The storytelling is crucial: "Without his narration, I couldn't make it past mile three," a Washington Post reporter confessed after attending a pair of John’s Memphis runs.

John describes the pace of his sight-jogs as "laid-back, not push, push, push”; they accommodate most skill and fitness levels. That’s partly because he himself hasn't always been a runner. Though he's now a seven-time marathon finisher, it was only a few years ago that he began running as part of a battle against a substance addiction he picked up in a stressful nursing job. It allowed me to channel my anger into something awesome,” he told Runner's World, who profiled his turnaround. If anything, he says, running has become even more essential to his life today: it’s "a way of life, a philosophy . . . It's very real. I sweat, and I feel it, and I love it."

For those who take care of their overall well-being with exercise, yoga, and balanced nutrition