$39 for $150 Toward Prescription Eyewear at Eyeballs

Lower Queen Anne

Value Discount You Save
$150 74% $111
Give as a Gift
Over 60 bought
Limited quantity available

In a Nutshell

More than 800 frames from small, independent designers including Oscar Magnuson, Salt, and Rudy Project

The Fine Print

Expires Jul 31st, 2013. Limit 1 per person, may buy 1 additional as gift. Limit 1 per visit. Valid in-store only. Not valid for sale items. Cannot be used with insurance. Cannot be combined with any other offers. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

An eye for an eye makes the whole world blind, which hampers investigations into the underground eye trade. Invest in your ocular assets with this Groupon.

$39 for $150 Toward Prescription Eyewear

Single-vision lenses ($128) fit snugly within more than 800 frames ($130–$460) crafted by small, independent designers from as close to home as Portland and as far away as London. Floor-to-ceiling displays showcase names such as Salt., Jono Hennessy, and götti.

Eyeballs

Optometrist James McCrum enjoys his job so much he lives at the office. Literally. As documented in a 2005 feature in Pacific Northwest Magazine, Dr. McCrum and his wife, Paula Whelan, converted the bare walls of what used to be a commercial building into a modern, urban-chic home office where they can live upstairs and work downstairs. The daunting project took a year and a half—about three times as long as they had originally planned. Whelan called upon her instincts as an artist to help design the 1,700-square-foot space. She used artwork made from swimming fins and roller skates and installed stair treads that are actually the repurposed rafters from the former building. Vibrant, playful pieces from Whelan's above-garage art studio spill over into the Eyeballs office, where lime-green chairs and bold, red mirrors complement her innovatively painted lampshades and eyewear-inspired artwork. Adding to the fun atmosphere, the reception desk boasts a blackboard where patients can doodle anything they want or copy poems discovered within the eye chart.

And the decor isn't the only aspect of the shop with a decidedly vivacious vibe. The lighthearted, friendly staff aims to make shopping for glasses fun and encourages leisurely browsing of boutique frames neatly arranged in drawers and open wall displays. Together with fellow optometrist Dr. Chris Hettinger, Dr. McCrum does his part to make each guest's visit a pleasant one by using a state-of-the-art retinal camera to check for issues such as diabetic retinopathy and macular degeneration.

For those who dress to thrill