$36 for "Arcadia," "Dead Metaphor," and "Stuck Elevator" at American Conservatory Theater (Up to $72 Value)

American Conservatory Theater

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Going to the theater lets you take in dramatic scenes at a safe distance, much like listening to your neighbors argue about how to pronounce "gnocchi." Hide behind the fourth wall with this GrouponLive deal to see Dead Metaphor, Stuck Elevator, and Arcadia at the American Conservatory Theater downtown. For $36, you get one ticket for mezzanine seating to each show (up to a $72 value). Plays, artists, and schedules are subject to change. Choose from the following seven performance packages:

  • 8 p.m. on Thursday, February 28, April 4, and May 16
  • 8 p.m. on Friday, March 1, April 5, and May 17
  • 2 p.m. on Saturday, March 2, April 6, and May 18
  • 8 p.m. on Saturday, March 2, April 6, and May 18
  • 8 p.m. on Tuesday, March 5, April 9, and May 21
  • 8 p.m. on Wednesday, March 6, April 10, and May 22
  • 2 p.m. on Sunday, March 10, April 14, and May 26

Doors open one hour before showtime.

Dead Metaphor (February 28–March 24)

This world premiere from playwright George F. Walker weaves a darkly comedic tale about the hypocrisies and absurdities an Iraq War veteran must face when he leaves the battlefield, moves in with his parents, and takes a job working for a politician on a crusade for "truth and justice."

Stuck Elevator (April 4–28)

Also gracing the stage for the first time, Stuck Elevator wins over eyes and ears with a unique musical set inside the eponymous people mover. Based on a true story, the plot delves into the 81-hour ordeal of a Chinese delivery man trapped between floors in the Bronx. As the clock slowly ticks, he becomes increasingly desperate, but he’s unwilling to sound the alarm for fear of revealing his undocumented immigrant status. Director Chay Yew—winner of the 2007 Obie award for Best Director—stages the show with his acclaimed, idiosyncratic eye and a time machine that shows him what his acclaimed, idiosyncratic eye would do in the future.

Arcadia (May 16–June 9)

Making a splash when it first premiered in 1993, Tom Stoppard's dizzyingly intellectual tour de force serves audiences an entrancing blend of comedy, drama, and thought-provoking ideas. Set in an expansive English manor, the play transitions back and forth between present time and the early 19th century, slowly revealing the house's mysteries. Determined to score literary success, two modern-day writers attempt to uncover the details of rumored events that occurred at the manor long ago. In the process, they start inadvertently learning the same truths about love and desire as the house’s inhabitants learned centuries earlier. The New York Times raves that the play’s script makes you feel as though "you're instantaneously aloft, soaring, banking, doing loop-the-loops and then, when you think you're about to plummet to earth, swooping to a gentle touchdown of not easily described sweetness and sorrow."

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    American Conservatory Theater

    415 Geary St.

    San Francisco, California 94102

    415-749-2228

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In a Nutshell

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World premieres of a new comedy and musical delight audiences before Stoppard's intellectual classic deftly mixes comedy and dizzying ideas

The Fine Print

Expiration varies. Limit 4 per person. Redeem starting 2/28/13 at venue. Valid only for option purchased. Must provide first and last name and mailing address at checkout, which Groupon will provide to facilitate redemption of voucher. Refundable only on day of purchase. Must purchase together to sit together. Discount reflects American Conservatory Theater's current ticket prices - price may differ on day of event. Doors open 1 hour prior to showtime. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

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