$27 for Blackfriar Theatre’s “It’s a Wonderful Life: A Live Radio Play” for Two on December 7, 13, or 15 ($54 Value)

Blackfriars Theatre

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In a Nutshell

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Veteran theater company presents holiday classic as a live radio show with sound effects and five actors that inhabit all of the characters

The Fine Print

Expiration varies. Limit 2/person. Valid only for option purchased. Reservation required. Reserve tickets via phone starting 11/10. Must show valid ID matching name on Groupon at Blackfriars Theatre. Must provide first and last name at checkout, which Groupon will provide to facilitate redemption of voucher. Refundable only on day of purchase. Discount reflects Blackfriars Theatre's current ticket prices - price may differ on day of event. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

Theater challenges audiences by blending the real and the imaginary, much like a neighbor who accuses you of giving her goiters with your brain. Enhance reality with this GrouponLive deal to see It’s a Wonderful Life: A Live Radio Play at Blackfriars Theatre. For $27, you get two general-admission tickets (a $54 value). Choose from the following performances:

  • Friday, December 7, at 8 p.m.
  • Thursday, December 13, at 7:30 p.m.
  • Saturday, December 15, at 2 p.m.

Now in its 62nd season, Blackfriars Theatre showcases the rising talents of western New York on its intimate stage, seating all viewers no more than four rows away from the action. For the holidays, the Theatre Row mainstay doubles down on old-fashioned charm with its clever, quaint, and heartwarming production of It’s a Wonderful Life: A Live Radio Play. Based upon the beloved Frank Capra and Jimmy Stewart Yuletide gem, this interpretation reimagines the movie as a live 1940s radio broadcast with five actors playing all of the denizens of Bedford Falls. Viewers can also test their Method-acting chops in the role of the “live studio audience.”

Much like Orson Welles’ War of the Worlds broadcast without the panic and frenzy, the show uses antiquated props, bulbous RCA microphones, and cunning foley work to tell George Bailey’s journey from suicidal humbug to holiday cheerleader. As the players build Bedford Falls in the minds of listeners, audiences enjoy an up-close view of 1940s radio trickery in famous scenes such as the swimming-pool Charleston and George’s ecstatic epiphany run through the town square.

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