Boston Philharmonic Orchestra: BPYO, Concert 2 at Symphony Hall on Friday, March 7 (Up to 50% Off)

Symphony Hall

Give as a Gift
8 bought
Limited quantity available

In a Nutshell

Live_logo

Boston Philharmonic music director Benjamin Zander leads the youth orchestra through pieces by Mozart, Barber, and Mahler

The Fine Print

Expires Mar 7th, 2014. Limit 8 per person. Valid only for option purchased. Redeem starting 3/7 for a ticket at venue box office. Must show valid ID matching name on Groupon at Symphony Hall. Refundable only on day of purchase. Must purchase together to sit together. Discount reflects Boston Philharmonic Orchestra's current ticket prices-price may differ on day of the event. Doors open 90 minutes before showtime. For ADA accommodations, call box office promptly upon receipt of voucher - availability is limited. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

Humans have five senses: hearing, seeing, touching, tasting, and hearing through the other ear. Treat at least three of them with this GrouponLive deal.

The Deal

  • One ticket to Boston Philharmonic Orchestra: BPYO, Concert 2
  • When: Friday, March 7, at 8 p.m.
  • Where: Symphony Hall
  • Door time: 6:30 p.m.
  • Ticket values include all fees.<p>

Seating Options

Boston Philharmonic Orchestra: BPYO, Concert 2

Benjamin Zander—the Philharmonic’s music director and noted Mahler expert—leads the Boston Philharmonic Youth Orchestra through an evening of beloved favorites, including Mahler’s Symphony No. 5.<p>

  • Mozart—Overture to The Marriage of Figaro: The famous comic opera moves at a fast clip, and its overture is no exception. The piece’s quick tempo and cheekily trilling strings lay a farcical foundation on which the rest of the opera builds.
  • Barber—Violin Concerto: The concerto was originally commissioned by soap tycoon Samuel Fels for his violinist son, but the deal ultimately fell through. Despite its inauspicious beginnings, the work’s combination of lush Romanticism and modern dissonance proves an admirable showcase for solo violin.
  • Mahler—Symphony No. 5: This formidable piece vacillates swiftly between rest and fury, light and dark. Following a crashing opening that evokes depths of tragedy, the symphony thunders through deliberately excessive movements before ultimately concluding on a triumphant note that celebrates Mahler’s marriage.<p>

Boston Philharmonic Orchestra

In 1979, conductor Benjamin Zander assembled 96 musicians of all stripes, with students, professionals, and amateur players dedicating themselves to performing music together. That diversity still holds true today. As the Boston Philharmonic Orchestra proudly states on their website, “The professionals maintain the highest standard, the students keep the focus on training and education, and the gifted amateurs…remind everybody that music-making is an expression of enthusiasm and love.”<p>

Such enthusiasm has attracted an all-star lineup of renowned soloists; Yo-Yo Ma, Oscar Shumsky, and Russell Sherman have all played with the BPO at various venues throughout Boston and the Northeast. Most concerts are preceded by lectures from Zander—who still serves as Maestro—to help audiences further understand the music. Discussions often cover the works’ structures and when to listen for the timpanist’s syncopated hiccups.


  1. 1

    Symphony Hall

    301 Massachusetts Avenue

    Boston, Massachusetts 02115

    617-236-0999

    Get Directions

Experiences that expand cultural awareness, such as museums, tours, and literature
Live sports, music, and theater events