$85 to See “Chaplin: The Musical” on Broadway at The Barrymore Theatre (Up to $135.50 Value)

Barrymore Theatre

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In a Nutshell

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The thigh-slapping comedy and unexpected tragedy of the legendary silent-film star leaps to life onstage in song and dance

The Fine Print

Expires Jan 6th, 2013. Limit 10/person. Customers buy through broadwayoffers.com. See Groupon's Third Party site terms here. Must purchase together to sit together. Hanwell Productions LLC is the issuer of tickets. Discount reflects Hanwell Productions LLC's current ticket prices - price may differ on day of event. Additional ticket fees apply at time of purchase. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

During Hollywood’s silent era, actors exaggerated their facial expressions to convey sadness and raised gramophones over their heads to express love. Watch how it all began with this GrouponLive deal to see Chaplin: The Musical on Broadway at The Barrymore Theatre. For $85, you get one ticket for seating in the orchestra section (up to a $135.50 value). This deal does not include service or handling charges, which run up to $10.75. Doors open one hour before the show. This Groupon is valid for the following dates and times:

  • Wednesday, December 26, at 2 p.m.
  • Wednesday, December 26, at 7:30 p.m.
  • Thursday, December 27 at 7 p.m.
  • Friday, December 28 at 8 p.m.
  • Saturday, December 29, at 2 p.m.
  • Saturday, December 29, at 8 p.m.
  • Sunday, December 30, at 2 p.m.
  • Tuesday, January 1, at 7:30 p.m.
  • Wednesday, January 2, at 2 p.m.
  • Wednesday, January 2, at 7:30 p.m.
  • Thursday, January 3, at 7 p.m.
  • Friday, January 4, at 8 p.m.
  • Saturday, January 5, at 2 p.m.
  • Saturday, January 5, at 8 p.m.
  • Sunday, January 6, at 3 p.m.

The Plot

Born into Dickensian destitution in 1889, Charlie Chaplin took his first job at age 7—not in show business, but in London’s unforgiving workhouses. Even then, the boy wanted nothing more than to be onstage, a dream encouraged by his mother, an aspiring actress herself. When he was 13 years old, Chaplin was already impressing the vaudevillians of England, and two tours of the United States kindled a new dream in the starry-eyed comedian: the dream of Hollywood. With the debut of his iconic character The Tramp in 1914’s Kid Auto Races at Venice, he tripped over his cane and fell into the annals of cinematic history. As his star grew brighter, Chaplin frequently met controversy—he was often lambasted in the gossip columns for his liberal politics by the likes of Hedda Hopper and scorned for his scandalous relationship with the much-younger Oona O’Neill. Through his hardships, Chaplin continued to produce some of the funniest and most poignant works of art ever committed to celluloid, including The Kid, City Lights, and 1940’s hilarious takedown of fascism, The Great Dictator.

Sights and Sounds

No story about Chaplin would be complete without a healthy dose of slapstick, and the rubber-limbed Rob McClure is more than up for the job. Besides the thigh-slapping physical feats, audiences will delight in dancing; a high-wire routine; and rousing, era-appropriate songs such as the choral “Life Can Be Like the Movies” and “What’cha Gonna Do?”—a deceptively upbeat piece about reality’s impositions on the Hollywood lifestyle.

The Barrymore Theatre

In 1928, Lee and J.J. Shubert built Ethel Barrymore her own theatre. Part of the duo’s acting dynasty, Barrymore had achieved wide renown in the U.S. and England, and so the management team decided to pay her honor by sculpting a monument suited to her stardom. Hers wasn’t the only theatre Lee and Shubert built, but it was the last. Today it still stands as a testament to the grandeur of the era, with an exterior modeled after Roman bathhouses and an interior that mashes Elizabethan, Mediterranean, and Adamsesque features including boxes crowned with sunburst patterns and filled with men in powdered wigs.

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