One Ticket to See Dream Theater at Pompano Beach Amphitheatre on October 21 at 7 p.m. (Up to $61.35 Value)

Pompano Beach Amphitheatre

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In a Nutshell

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Famed progressive-metal virtuosos immerse fans in unpredictable soundscapes in support of latest album

The Fine Print

Expires Oct 21st, 2011. Limit 4 per person. Redeem on day of show for admission. Must show valid ID matching name on Groupon at Pompano Beach Amphitheatre. Must provide first and last name at checkout, which will be provided to Pompano Beach Amphitheatre. Refundable only on day of purchase. Must redeem together to sit together. Discount reflects Live Nation's current ticket prices-price may differ on day of the event. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

Music achieves its full emotional effect only when performed live, just as great literature becomes comprehensible only when screamed aloud in a crowded subway train. Enjoy public performance with today's GrouponLive deal: for $31, you get one reserved ticket to see Dream Theater at Pompano Beach Amphitheatre on Friday, October 21, at 7 p.m. (up to a $61.35 value, including all ticketing fees). Doors open at 6 p.m. Reserved seating is located in sections A–C.

Dream Theater, the inimitable heroes of progressive metal, return to the road to give distinguished ears a heaping taste of its thick, impenetrable soundscapes. Touring behind its 11th studio album, A Dramatic Turn of Events, the band possesses a musical virtuosity that suggests each member started writing songs in utero by practicing on their umbilical cords. From guitarist John Petrucci’s Guitar Player magazine centerfolds and mantel of Best Metal Guitarist medals to John Myung’s acclaimed undertow bass and Mike Mangini’s labyrinth mega-drum kit (a city made of skins, cymbals, and Neil Peart’s bucket list), the prodigious talents and mind-altering melodies of Dream Theater have drilled into the subconscious of millions of fans for more than 25 years. Its live show beckons audiences to dip their ear toes into pools of molten imagination and whimsical metal, courtesy of an unpredictable set that may consist of new songs, old ditties, or “Mary Had a Little Lamb” as sung from the point of view of a melancholy fire hydrant.

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