$38 for Jake Shimabukuro Ukulele Concert for Two at Carnegie Library Music Hall on November 27 at 7:30 p.m. ($76 Value)

Carnegie Library Music Hall

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In a Nutshell

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Ukulele virtuoso melds traditional Hawaiian music with jazz, classical, and rock, and performs tracks from his new album, Grand Ukulele

The Fine Print

Expires Nov 27th, 2012. Limit 4 per person. Redeem starting day of show for a ticket at venue Box Office. Must show valid ID matching name on Groupon at Carnegie Library Music Hall. Must provide first and last name at checkout, which Groupon will provide to facilitate redemption of voucher. Refundable only on day of purchase. Must redeem together to sit together.Discount reflects Drusky Entertainment's current ticket prices-price may differ on day of the event. Doors open 1hr before showtime. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

Music is all around us—in the wind, the rain, and the weird sounds that children make. Listen to something that's actually been rehearsed with this GrouponLive deal to see ukulele virtuoso Jake Shimabukuro at the Carnegie Library Music Hall in Munhall. For $38, you get two tickets for reserved main-floor seating on Tuesday, November 27, at 7:30 p.m. (a $76 value). Doors open at 6:30 p.m.

Unexpected, melodic, and passionately frenetic notes soar from the four strings of Hawaiian native Jake Shimabukuro’s ukulele as he reimagines classic songs and expertly plucks out original tunes. Referring to his chosen musical apparatus as "the underdog of all instruments," Shimabukuro coaxes out all the ukulele's strengths and nuances until it croons mightily and bench-presses his microphone. Drawing on influences from Bach to Miles Davis, Shimabukuro embodies a modern Jimi Hendrix as he pours out classics such as Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody" and The Beatles' "While My Guitar Gently Weeps" between tracks from his Billboard World Albums chart-topper, Peace Love Ukulele. Shimabukuro also plays tracks from his ambitious new album, Grand Ukulele, produced by Alan Parsons, the sound engineer of Pink Floyd’s The Dark Side of the Moon.

Dedicated to opening audiences' collective hearts to all that the ukulele can do, Shimabukuro exclaims, "It feels so great at the end of a show when someone comes up to me and says, 'You have changed the way that I look at this instrument.'" His island chimes reverberate sweetly off the opulent dome of the hillside Carnegie Library Music Hall, a historic French Renaissance–inspired structure that is known as the “Jewel of the Valley” and overlooks famed industrialist Andrew Carnegie’s Homestead Steel Works.

Carnegie Library Music Hall

Any good library contains a wealth of knowledge and invites its guests to explore brand new worlds. The Carnegie Library of Homestead accomplishes both of these feats by not only housing an enormous collection of texts, but also its very own concert venue, the Carnegie Library Music Hall. Seated under a twinkling chandelier hanging from a stately domed ceiling, up to 1,022 patrons enjoy everything from operas to symphony orchestras and dance recitals. A proscenium of nostalgically round bulbs crests over the stage, and elaborate carvings of cherubs often come alive to "shhh!" audience members. The library itself perches atop a grass hill in all of its bricked glory, overlooking the historic borough of Munhall.

Experiences that expand cultural awareness, such as museums, tours, and literature