"Fela!" Musical Featuring Michelle Williams at Fox Theatre on March 5 or 6 (Up to 41% Off)

Fox Theatre

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In a Nutshell

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Broadway cast and vocal acrobat Michelle Williams steer rousing Tony-winning show about Nigerian musical innovator and activist Fela Kuti

The Fine Print

Expires Mar 7th, 2013. Limit 8 per person. Valid only for option purchased. Redeem starting day of show for a ticket at venue Box Office. Must show valid ID matching name on Groupon at Fox Theatre. Refundable only on day of purchase. Must purchase together to sit together. Discount reflects Fela! The Musical's current ticket prices-price may differ on day of the event. Doors open 1hr before showtime. For ADA seating, call box office promptly upon receipt of voucher – availability is limited. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

Biographical musicals tend to sugarcoat the details of their subjects’ real lives, such as Annie Oakley's tone deafness and Simba's tendency to eat meerkats. Sing along to historical accuracy with this GrouponLive deal to see Fela! at the Fox Theatre. Doors open one hour before showtime. Choose from the following shows and seating options:

  • For $40, you get one ticket for seating in rows CC–HH of the orchestra (up to a $67.10 value, including all fees).
  • For $46, you get one ticket for seating in rows N–Y of the orchestra (up to a $77.55 value, including all fees).

For the above options, choose from the following performances:

  • Tuesday, March 5, at 8 p.m.
  • Wednesday, March 6, at 8 p.m.

Nominated for 11 2010 Tony Awards and winner of three, the inspirational musical Fela! thrills the senses with stunning choreography, elaborate sets, and soulful sounds as it celebrates legendary Nigerian musician and activist Fela Anikulapo Kuti. In telling the legend's astounding life story, Fela! explodes with dances set to original Kuti songs performed by the touring Broadway cast and former Destiny's Child superstar Michelle Williams. Williams, who recently joined the production, has plenty of previous experience on the stage—along with her time in Destiny’s Child, she has been a cast member in Broadway’s Aida and The Color Purple. In 2009, she made history by being the first African-American woman to play Roxie Hart in the London West End production of Chicago. Williams, along with her esteemed cast, interpret Kuti’s musical journey. Kuti sowed the seeds of Afrobeat music, which finally gave the world something to dance to besides Morse code. The sonic movement intertwined political themes, native harmonies, and energetic instrumentation such as bombastic horns and galloping congas to fight for civil rights and squash government oppression in a nonlethal fashion. Bowling over critics and presented by showbiz moguls Jay-Z, Will Smith, and Jada Pinkett Smith, the powerhouse spectacle packs an indomitable spirit of courage, passion, and love, leaving audiences spellbound and gratefully afflicted with restless-body syndrome.

Fox Theatre

Flush with cash during the roaring ‘20s, Atlanta's Shriners set out to build a magnificent monument for their headquarters, dubbed the Yaarab Temple Shrine Mosque. The structure was to feature grandiose architectural touches such as towering minarets and onion domes. When a teetering economy threatened construction, the Shriners sold the building to film mogul William Fox, who finished the space as a movie palace with virtually no changes to its extravagant design. As splendid as the exterior was, audiences were unprepared for the interior, absolutely dizzying in its opulence. After seeing the auditorium for the first time, one Atlanta Journal reporter breathlessly remarked on the "picturesque and almost disturbing grandeur" on display.

Crafted to resemble the courtyard of a Moorish castle, the main hall's decorations begin in the back with a faux canopy of plaster and steel stretching over the rear balcony. Stone parapets wrap around the sides, culminating in a towering proscenium arch illuminated by hanging lanterns and overhung with persian rugs. Above, a blue ceiling sparkles with hundreds of recessed light bulbs, which refract through three-inch crystals as projected clouds drift from side to side and rain on anyone who texts during a show.

The final jewel in the theater's gilded crown is the The Mighty Mo Organ. The second largest theater organ in the world, the Mighty Mo was custom built in 1929 for the princely sum of $42,000 to accompany any movie or production imaginable with its richly textured sounds. The instrument’s powerful sound comes from 3,622 pipes of varying length, with the smallest no larger than a pen and the largest spanning five feet across. The makers also installed a real glockenspiel, marimba, and xylophone, as well as a system by which the stage's grand piano can be played remotely from the organ, adding its sonic tapestry and spooking the theater’s resident ghosts.

Musical theater, celebrated revivals, and tributes to well-loved musicians