Ralphie May Comedy Show on September 11 at 8 p.m. or September 13 at 7 p.m. (Up to 52% Off)

Multiple Locations

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In a Nutshell

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The Last Comic Standing finalist draws laughs with his boyish charm and piercing observations that have been featured on DVDs

The Fine Print

Expiration varies. Limit 10 per person. Valid only for option purchased. Redeem starting on day of show for a ticket at venue box office. Must show valid ID matching name on Groupon at venue. Must provide first and last name at checkout, which Groupon will provide to facilitate redemption of voucher. Refundable only on day of purchase. Must redeem together to sit together. Discount reflects Ravens Flight Creative Productions' current ticket prices - price may differ on day of the event. Doors open 1 hour before showtime. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

Standup comedians typically draw from real life, such as bad relationships or how the zoo is crazy. Life's a riot with this GrouponLive deal to see comedian Ralphie May. Choose between the following cities and performances:

  • For $13, you get general admission to a Ralphie May comedy show at the McDonald Theatre in Eugene on Tuesday, September 11, at 8 p.m. (up to a $25 value, including all fees).
  • For $13, you get general admission to a Ralphie May comedy show at The Historic Elsinore Theatre in Salem on Thursday, September 13, at 7 p.m. (up to a $27 value, including all fees).

From the moment Ralphie May walks onto the stage, he demands attention with his 400-pound frame and incongruously high-pitched voice, juxtaposing quick barbs against lengthy pauses to wittily lance society's absurdities. His Southern drawl and babyish looks won him second place in NBC's Last Comic Standing and launched him into the comedy stratosphere, where he starred in several Comedy Central specials and DVDs, including Prime Cut, in which he pokes fun at the adorably awful hairstyles that are popular in his native Dixie. This past March, during his Too Big to Ignore special, Ralphie mused on the unforeseen perks of resembling a famous transgender celebrity, leaving audiences as delighted as a clown who finally saved up enough to buy his own personal limousine.

McDonald Theatre

Listed in the National Registry of Historic Places, the McDonald Theatre has enjoyed a long, strange history since its establishment in 1925. Originally a community playhouse equipped with both a stage and a screen, the theater found new life in the 1950s when One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest author and psychedelic pioneer Ken Kesey began presenting free cartoons there every Saturday morning. The McDonald spent the next six or so decades as a movie house exclusively, but in 2001, the Kesey family returned, producing concerts and community events under the theater’s enormous proscenium arch. Kesey Enterprises finally purchased the time-weighted stage in 2009, and today the building hosts events ranging from high-school proms to reggae concerts to plumbing-fixture lifting contests.

Live shows that'll make you laugh, including stand-up and improv acts