Confederate Railroad Concert for Two at Main Street Armory on Friday, February 8, at 7 p.m. (Half Off)

Main Street Armory

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In a Nutshell

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Grammy-nominated country rockers mix humor & heart in hits “Trashy Women” & “Jesus and Mama”; VIPs meet the band & enjoy prime seating

The Fine Print

Expires Feb 8th, 2013. Limit 2 per person. Valid only for option purchased. Redeem starting 2/8/13 for a ticket at venue. Must show valid ID matching name on Groupon at Main Street Armory. Must provide first and last name at checkout, which Groupon will provide to facilitate redemption of voucher. Refundable only on day of purchase. Discount reflects Main Street Armory's current ticket prices-price may differ on day of the event. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

Country music harks back to a more courteous era, when kids still called women "ma'am" and men "daddy ma'am." Tip your hat to the good ol' days with this GrouponLive deal to see Confederate Railroad at Main Street Armory on Friday, February 8, at 7 p.m. Doors open at 6 p.m. Choose from the following options:

  • For $25, you get two tickets for general admission (a $50 value).
  • For $45, you get two VIP tickets for guaranteed seating in the first five rows (a $90 value).
  • For $75, you get two Executive VIP tickets (a $150 value), which include:
    • Guaranteed seating in the first five rows
    • Access to private lounge
    • Meet and greet with Confederate Railroad

Although he never cottoned to the title himself, Waylon Jennings might say “fiddlesticks” to the glut of modern acts bandying the “outlaw” label without the proper credentials. The venerable country-rock warhorse of Confederate Railroad rightfully earned those stripes in its days as the road band for indisputable outlaw legends David Allan Coe and Johnny Paycheck. Much like an actual outlaw, Grammy-nominated Confederate Railroad has been on the run for decades, is wanted in states across the country, and would befuddle any skiptracer following the eclectic venues it performs at.

Formed in 1987, the Georgia-bred quintet was already tighter than a hog-tied drum when their Atlantic Records debut was released in 1992. The self-titled, double-platinum album put six singles on the charts, scored a Best New Group award from the Academy of Country Music, and quickly earned the band a devout following, leading to an overall 18 charted hits and five million albums sold since then. Steered by Danny Shirley’s tumbleweed twang and a rhythm section replete with steel guitar, fiddle, and high-lonesome harmonies, Confederate Railroad proudly rides the fence between poignancy and unbridled silliness in their gregarious live performances. Mixing weepers such as “Jesus and Mama” with tongue-in-cheek hits such as “Daddy Cut the Big One” and “Trashy Women,” the band puts on a show that many generations can enjoy. Starting the show, local favorites The Closing Time Band get heels kicking with their hard-driving country rave-ups.

Confederate Railroad – “Trashy Women” (Official Video)

Main Street Armory

In 1905, Main Street Armory was a modern-day castle built by the Army Corps of Engineers as the headquarters for western New York’s Third Battalion. During World Wars I and II, soldiers completed their final processing and training at the armory before heading overseas. Rochester’s first professional basketball team, the Rochester Centrals, pounded the armory’s floors in the 1920s, and The Lone Ranger's Tonto, otherwise known as actor Jay Silverheels, played lacrosse in the armory’s arena. Abandoned by the National Guard in 1990, the mighty venue almost slipped through the cracks until it was purchased and refurbished by local entrepreneur Scott Donaldson.

Now a multipurpose facility for the performing arts, the former home of ammunition now houses banquet rooms, a paintball facility, and space for an upcoming restaurant and arcade. Most importantly, the restored main arena allows up to 5,000 concertgoers to enjoy big-name rock, rap, dance, and country concerts. Visitors at the Main Street Armory might also brush elbows with (alleged) ghosts.