Odyssey Theatre Presents "Arms and the Man" at Strathcona Park on July 30–August 20 (Up to 43% Off)

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In a Nutshell

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Mask-clad actors gather under the stars to pull back the current on the romance of war

The Fine Print

Expiration varies. Limit 4 per person. Valid only for option purchased. Reservation required. Redeem for a ticket at venue Box Office starting 1 hour before showtime. Must show valid ID matching name on Groupon at Strathcona Park. Refundable only on day of purchase. Must reserve together to sit together. Discount reflects Odyssey Theatre's current ticket prices-price may differ on day of the event. Doors open 30 minutes before showtime. For accessible seating, call box office promptly upon receipt of voucher - availability is limited. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

Watching a play is the second-best way to achieve emotional catharsis, right behind writing a play about achieving emotional catharsis. Tear-stain a playbill with this GrouponLive deal.

The Deal

  • $30 for two tickets to see Odyssey Theatre presents Arms and the Man (up to a $52.62 value)
  • When: Tuesdays at 8 p.m., from July 30 to August 20
  • Where: Strathcona Park
  • Section: general admission
  • Door time: 30minutes before each performance
  • Ticket values include all fees.
  • Click here to view all available performances.

Student and senior discounted tickets are available but this Groupon still offers the best deal available. Children 12 and younger are regularly admitted for $10.49 including fees.

Arms and the Man

For what would become one of his first commercially successful plays and one of his most well-worn comedies, George Bernard Shaw chose a seemingly bleak backdrop: the 1885 Serbo-Bulgarian War. At the fringe of the fighting, Raina remains home, engaged to Sergius, a hero of the Bulgarian army. But when Captain Bluntschli, a mercenary for the Serbian army, flees the battle through Raina's bedroom window and begs her to hide him, conversation lays the foundation to romance. At first she sees Bluntschli as a coward, the opposite of her heroic hubby-to-be, carrying chocolate bars instead of pistol cartridges. Yet when Sergius returns from war and flirts more with Raina's servant, Louka, than with her, she sees Bluntschli in a new light, leading to flared tempers. Engaging in the verbal volleys, razor-sharp wit, and holographic scenery that are hallmarks of Shaw's plays, Arms and the Man unfolds the hypocrisies of human nature and pulls back the romantic curtain on the very unromantic actuality of war.

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