$20 for "Who Loves You, Baby?" Telly Savalas Tribute Act Plus Two Drinks at SoHo Playhouse ($39 Value). 12 Shows Available.

Huron Club at the SoHo Playhouse

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In a Nutshell

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'70s tough-guy icon is reborn in comedy act that spins outrageous yarns with manly advice in historic lounge space of Huron Club

The Fine Print

Expiration varies. Limit 6 per person. Redeem on day of show for admission at Huron Club at the SoHo Playhouse box office. Must show valid ID matching name on Groupon at Huron Club at the SoHo Playhouse. Must provide first and last name at checkout, which will be provided to Huron Club at the SoHo Playhouse. Soho Playhouse is the issuer of tickets. Refundable only on day of purchase. Must purchase together to sit together. Discount reflects Soho Playhouse's current ticket prices-price may differ on day of the event. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

At the start of the 1970s, classic rock was the soundtrack, bell-bottoms were the uniform, and watergates were the trendy devices used to corral pet seahorses. Swim through the currents of time with this GrouponLive deal to see Who Loves You, Baby? at the Huron Club of the SoHo Playhouse. For $20, you get a VIP package with one reserved VIP seat in the front and two drinks (a $39 value). All shows start at 8 p.m. Choose from the following shows:

  • Thursday, May 3
  • Friday, May 4
  • Thursday, May 10
  • Friday, May 11
  • Thursday, May 17
  • Friday, May 18
  • Thursday, May 24
  • Friday, May 25
  • Thursday, May 31
  • Friday, June 1
  • Thursday, June 7
  • Friday, June 8

If your name were Aristotle, it would be hard not to be profound. Aristotle "Telly" Savalas––the actor who exuded '70s masculinity as TV cop Kojak––proves not to be an exception. The smirking, self-aware alpha male swaggers on stage to piano accompaniment in Who Loves You, Baby?, a retro lounge comedy show where Tom DiMenna embodies Telly's persona––complete with a bald cap, a holster, and a butterfly-collared shirt tucked into a leisure suit.

Immersed in character, DiMenna delves into stories about looking for Colombo's glass eye and croons "interpretations" of classic love songs. The man's man also dishes out advice to 21st century gents: "Tuck in your shirt, get rid of those tennis shoes," he barks. "Do something as simple and sentimental as perfuming your bed sheets." Telly's words of wisdom have hit home, especially at last year's Fringe Festival, where NYTheatre.com proclaimed that "you will not see a funnier play."

Besides Telly, many other famous men have stood on the land where the historic SoHo Playhouse rests. In colonial times, General George Washington made the mansion his headquarters, and in the 1960s, playwrights such as Edward Albee, Terrence McNally, and Sam Shepard staged their early work there, escorting in an era when drama regularly roamed the iconic row house and people used theater to forget about everyday burdens such as saving up for a car and imagining a future with flying cars.

Live shows that'll make you laugh, including stand-up and improv acts