Kings of the Mic Featuring LL Cool J, Ice Cube, Public Enemy, and De La Soul on June 7 at St. Augustine Amphitheatre

St. Augustine Amphitheatre

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In a Nutshell

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Kings of hip-hop claim their thrones in a nationwide tour full of fast lyrics, politically charged messages, and timeless beats

The Fine Print

Expires Jun 7th, 2013. Limit 8 per person. Valid only for option purchased. G-Pass not redeemable with mobile app. Use for admission at St. Augustine Amphitheatre on 6/7. Must show valid ID matching name on Groupon. Refundable only on day of purchase. Must purchase together to sit together. Discount reflects Ticketmaster's current ticket prices - price may differ on day of event. Doors open 1 hour before showtime. Merchant reserves the right to substitute closer seat assignment. For ADA seating, call box office promptly upon receipt of voucher - availability is limited. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

Every rap track must have a solid backbeat, which can be composed of the sound of drums, handclaps, or birds flying into glass doors. Feel the rhythm with this Groupon.

The Deal

  • One G-Pass to the Kings of the Mic tour with LL Cool J featuring DJ Z-Trip, Ice Cube, Public Enemy, and De La Soul
  • When: Friday, June 7, at 6:30 p.m.
  • Where: St. Augustine Amphitheatre
  • Door time: 5:30 p.m.
  • Ticket values include all fees.<p>

Seating Options

  • $27 for rows O–T of section 201 or 203 (up to a $52.80 value)
  • $37 for rows C–G of section 101 or rows C, D, H, or J–N of section 103 (up to a $73.75 value)
  • Click here to view the seating chart.<p>

**How G-Pass Works:** Your G-Pass will be ready to print 48 hours after the deal ends. Print the G-Pass and use it to enter the venue directly; you won’t need to redeem at will call. Due to security restrictions, G-Passes cannot be redeemed through the Groupon mobile app.

LL Cool J

**LL Cool J featuring Joe – “Take It,” a bonus track off _Authentic_**

When LL Cool J spat, “Don’t call it a comeback, I been here for years” on 1990’s Mama Said Knock You Out, he wasn’t just telling the truth, he was making hip-hop history. A dozen albums, two Grammy awards, platinum and gold certifications, and countless hits later, he’s still here and going strong. This year’s Authentic sees not only his return to music after 2009’s “NCIS: No Crew Is Superior,” but perhaps his most ambitious effort yet. Like the birthday party of a genie’s best friend, the record’s guest list features Bootsy Collins; Earth, Wind & Fire; Snoop Dogg; Chuck D; and Eddie Van Halen, drawing on each performer’s unique talents for a record that plays like a greatest-hits compilation. Authentic hits every note of LL’s diverse career, from hard-hitting protest jams such as “Whaddup” to sexy ballads such as “Between the Sheetz.”

Ice Cube

**Ice Cube – “Gangsta Rap Made Me Do It,” off 2008's _Raw Footage_** _Warning: contains profanity and questionable history lessons_

One of the founding fathers of gangsta rap, and a former central figure of N.W.A, Ice Cube has been a force to reckon with since 1987’s Straight Outta Compton. Over the years, Cube has hit them hard and fast with landscape-shaping jams such as “AmeriKKKa’s Most Wanted,” “Check Yo Self,” and “It Was a Good Day.” Recent years have seen him adopt a more thoughtful lyrical philosophy without turning his back on his roots. On 2010’s I Am the West, he decries the state of up-and-coming artists in tracks such as “No Country for Young Men” and channels Kool Keith punch lines on “She Couldn’t Make It On Her Own.”

Public Enemy

**Public Enemy – “I Shall Not Be Moved,” off 2012's _Most of My Heroes Still Don't Appear on No Stamp_**

In the infancy of hip-hop, when the genre was still a niche, rap was a gentler thing. Then Public Enemy rushed the show and altered the architecture of the art form. Ranked as one of the 100 Greatest Artists by Rolling Stone, Public Enemy stirred up controversy by using music as a weapon in critically exalted classics such as It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back and Fear of a Black Planet. They brought the noise with a hardcore sound packed with penetrating beats and samples that pounded like a gong-hitter who traded his mallet for a jackhammer. Hype man Flavor Flav added madness and levity that gave Chuck D’s gruff baritone extra sting as he spat lyrics that were urgent, political, critical, and fearless invitations to a revolution. Nearly 30 years since the group’s formation, that invitation remains extended.

De La Soul

**De La Soul – “A Roller Skating Jam Named 'Saturdays'” at Bestival 2012**

From the very outset De La Soul was hailed as the future of hip-hop. Combining funk and soul with jazz, reggae, and psychedelia, their 1989 debut, 3 Feet High and Rising, was a gentler alternative to the hardcore rap splashing around the scene at the time. Posdnuos, Trugoy the Dove, and Pasemaster Mase preached peace and love from the beginning, and even as later albums incorporated darker elements, they never quite gave in to gangsta rap. In recent years the trio has been collaborating with artists ranging from MF Doom to the Gorillaz, evincing their status as one of alternative rap’s reigning dignitaries and earning a Grammy in the process.

‘G-Pass Non-Mobile’ callout not found.

St. Augustine Amphitheatre

History is built into the very foundation of St. Augustine Amphitheatre. Built in 1965 to commemorate the city's quadricentennial, the stage immediately began featuring Cross and Sword, a historical drama about the founding of St. Augustine. It was a tradition that continued unbroken for 32 years. In 2002, St. Johns County funded a refurbishing of the amphitheater. Five years later—after upgrading the capacity, constructing a hikeable arboretum, and clearing out lingering conquistadors—the new facility is capable of comfortably hosting up to 4,100 concertgoers.


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    St. Augustine Amphitheatre

    1340 A1A S

    St. Augustine, Florida 32080

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