$15 for Two to See "Tartuffe" at Loyola University ($30 Value). Seven Dates Available.

Newhart Family Theatre

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In a Nutshell

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Molière's classical comedy, originally censored by Louis XIV, uses rhyming couplets to tell the tale of a seemingly pious conman

The Fine Print

Expiration varies. Limit 8 per person. Valid only for option purchased. Reservation required. Redeem starting 2/16 for a ticket. Must show valid ID matching name on Groupon at Newhart Family Theatre. Refundable only on day of purchase. Discount reflects Loyola University Chicago's current ticket prices-price may differ on day of the event. Doors open 1hr before showtime. For ADA seating, call box office promptly upon receipt of voucher – availability is limited. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

Going to a play is like going to a movie, except the actors are actually in the room with you instead of trapped behind a giant sheet. Marvel at free thespians with this GrouponLive deal to see Tartuffe, presented by Loyola University Chicago's Department of Fine and Performing Arts at the Newhart Family Theatre. For $15, you get general admission for two (a $30 value). Choose from the following performances

  • Friday, February 22, at 7:30 p.m.
  • Saturday, February 23, at 7:30 p.m.
  • Sunday, February 24, at 2 p.m.
  • Thursday, February 28, at 7:30 p.m.
  • Friday, March 1, at 7:30 p.m.
  • Saturday, March 2, at 7:30 p.m.
  • Sunday, March 3, at 2 p.m.

Tartuffe

Molière's classical comedy revolves around a title character so morally outrageous that his name has become synonymous with hypocrisy. On the outside, Tartuffe is a pious houseguest preoccupied with faith and good deeds, prompting the wealthy Orgon to invite him into his mansion. But in reality, he is a conman, and as the stark contrast between what he preaches and what he practices inspires laughs from the audience, he's busily swindling his way into Orgon's flush inheritance. Right after its inaugural production in 17th-century France, Tartuffe stirred up controversy with King Louis XIV, who was worried that it made the upper class look foolish. This led to a temporary ban on the play, but it has gone on to become one of the most lauded and performed theatrical comedies in the world, praised for its rhyming couplets and biting social satire.

Newhart Family Theatre

Situated inside Loyola University's Mundelein Center for the Fine and Performing Arts, the Newhart Family Theatre stands as a tribute to famous Loyola alumnus Bob, as well as his sisters, who also attended Mundelein College. The school was incorporated into Loyola in 1991, and the 215- to 235-seat theater occupies its former gymnasium. It also includes scenic, lighting, and costume shops, whose staffs are tasked with crafting realistic visual details, such as the light-up sneakers that define every Shakespeare play. Recording studios, practice rooms, and a recital hall make the center a hub of student activity.


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    Newhart Family Theatre

    1020 W Sheridan Rd.

    Chicago, Illinois 60660

    773-508-8400

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