$10 to See Thalia Symphony Orchestra presents "Spring Concert" at Town Hall Seattle (Up to $20 Value)

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Led by conductor Stephen Rogers Radcliffe, a symphony of instrumentalists sonically explores classical masterpieces in a historic venue

The Fine Print

Expires Apr 13th, 2013. Limit 8 per person. Redeem starting 4/13 for a ticket at venue Will Call. Must show valid ID matching name on Groupon at Town Hall Seattle. Refundable only on day of purchase. Discount reflects Thalia Symphony Orchestra's current ticket prices-price may differ on day of the event. Doors open 30 minutes before showtime. For ADA seating, call box office promptly upon receipt of voucher - availability is limited. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

A night at the symphony not only provides a lasting memory of refined musical prowess; it also keeps patrons from resorting to the boring routine of watching the TV boil. Mix up your evening with this GrouponLive deal to see the Thalia Symphony Orchestra presents "Spring Concert" at Town Hall Seattle. For $10, you get one general admission ticket on Saturday, April 13, at 8 p.m. (up to a $20 value). Doors open at 7:30 p.m.

The Thalia Symphony Orchestra showcases a troupe of more than 80 instrumentalists who sonically weave classical masterpieces under the precise baton of conductor Stephen Rogers Radcliffe. Their spring concert opens with Finnish composer Jean Sibelius' Overture and Suite from "Karelia." Written to accompany a historical pageant celebrating Finnish patriotism, the pieces draw on themes from peasant music and traditional dances. The suite's opening intermezzo depicts woodsmen marching with stirring drums, proud horn fanfares, and solos by musical trees.

One of Tchaikovsky's most successful works, Eugene Onegin sets Alexander Pushkin's wildly popular verse novel to music. Opening the second and third acts respectively, the Waltz and Polonaise tellingly set the scenes with a cheerful, mild-mannered waltz before a dark, tumultuous party. The jubilant Polonaise's thundering timpanis couple with frenetic strings and woodwinds to mock the title character's abject loneliness as he stands alone, awkwardly humming, at a ball. Saint Saëns Morceau de Concert for Harp and Orchestra features harpist Ruth S. Mar in a feisty piece with shifting, rippling melodies and orchestral harmonies. Closing out the evening, Mendelssohn's Symphony no. 5 features a luminescent fourth movement based off Martin Luther's hymn "A Mighty Fortress is Our God."

Thalia Symphony Orchestra

Thalia, one of the Greek muses said to inspire artists, must have paid Seattle a visit in 1949. That's when Mikael Scheremetiew—himself a violinist and conductor—established the Thalia Symphony Orchestra and named it for that mythic figure. Scheremetiew's wish was to give fellow local musicians another creative outlet, and it was more than granted. After a brief flirtation with opera, the organization devoted itself to music, and the aural tradition continues today.

The modern iteration of the orchestra, headed by new conductor Michael Miropolsky, features 80-plus instrumentalists, a core group frequently joined by noted soloists. The ensemble regularly performs unique concerts showcasing the work of composers united by common themes—a Tchaikovsky suite might share billing with a Dvorak symphony, while a Wagner overture could be accompanied by Schubert's latest remix. The orchestra's access to such a wide range of works is partially afforded by its Thalia Scheremetiew Library, one of the largest private music collections in the region.

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