Symphony with Fireworks, or Tchaikovsky & Dvorak at The Mann Center for the Performing Arts (Up to Half Off)

Philadelphia

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In a Nutshell

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Fireworks and big-screen imagery enliven timeless classics; renowned cellist joins symphony for program focusing on the Romantic era

The Fine Print

Expiration varies. Limit 8 per person. Valid only for option purchased. Redeem on day of show for tickets at venue box office. Must show valid ID matching name on Groupon at The Mann Center for the Performing Arts. Must provide first and last name at checkout, which Groupon will provide to facilitate redemption of voucher. Refundable only on day of purchase. Must redeem together to sit together. Discount reflects Ticketmaster's current ticket prices - price may differ on day of event. Doors open 2 hours before showtime. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

Classical music and explosives have always gone well together, from Handel's Music for the Royal Fireworks to Beethoven's famous leveling of Vienna with artillery tuned to G major. Mingle grace notes and gunpowder with this GrouponLive deal for two symphonic concerts at The Mann Center for the Performing Arts. Choose from the following options:

Backed by big-screen imagery and an arsenal of fireworks, The Philadelphia Orchestra makes familiar masterworks sound freshly minted even to grizzled eardrums. Wagner's "Ride of the Valkyries" opens with its strafing run from the brass section and is chased by Rimsky-Korsakov's "Flight of the Bumblebee" before Mendelssohn's "Wedding March" ushers in a procession comprised of Tchaikovsky's "Waltz of the Flowers," Holst's "Jupiter" movement from The Planets, and a host of equally epic melodies. As conductor Michael Krajewski shepherds the music into the patriotic purview of West Side Story's "America," Copland's climax to Appalachian Spring, "America the Beautiful," and the 1812 Overture, the night sky explodes into a glittering panorama of colored plumes and starbursts.

The Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, meanwhile, draws its pyrotechnics from the expressive virtuosity and lyrical melodies of the Romantic era. Glinka's overture to Ruslan and Lyudmila kicks things off with a propulsive tidal wave of trumpets and vertiginous strings. Next, the orchestra sets up the sonata of Dvorak's Cello Concerto in B minor—just in time for soloist Johannes Moser to make it his own with inky rumbles, sweet punctuations along the higher registers, and a rich middle range that flows like dancing butterscotch from his Andrea Guarneri cello. Moser infuses his bowmanship with the same metal-head energy he's lent to the New York Philharmonic, the London Symphony Orchestra, and the Berlin Philharmonic. Finally, conductor Manfred Honeck turns his baton to Tchaikovsky's Symphony No. 5 in E minor, as its cyclical theme starts out behind the funereal march of a stately clarinet, then ducks down a side street of shifting moods and time signatures that are by turns hopeful, love-struck, ruminative, and ultimately triumphant.

The Mann Center for the Performing Arts dates back to 1935, when it opened as an outdoor venue for The Philadelphia Orchestra's summer concerts. At its current location since 1976, the massive auditorium seats more than 8,000 beneath its canopy roof, with room for thousands more to lounge on the surrounding lawn or jetpack through the surrounding air.

The Mann Center

The Mann Center is a prepossessing structure from anywhere you sit in the semi-covered amphitheater—all huge, rough slabs of timber that evoke the setting for a barn dance held by elegant giants. Even the lawn section isn’t an ordinary lawn: from the top of the steep hill where the theater perches, audiences can see not only the performers lighting up the stage below but also the canopy of trees in surrounding Fairmount Park and the city skyline just beyond.

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