Individual or Dual Membership to the Harry Ransom Center in Austin (Half Off)

University of Texas - Austin

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History tends to repeat itself, which means there's a good chance you'll get run over by another war elephant. Learn from the past with this Groupon.

Choose Between Two Options

  • $25 for an individual membership (a $50 value)
  • $45 for a dual membership (a $90 value)

Membership benefits include personalized membership cards, insider access and behind-the-scenes glimpses of the Ransom Center and it's collections, invitations to exhibition openings and other exclusive member events. Forthcoming events include an opening party on Friday, September 14 for the fall exhibition “I Have Seen the Future: Norman Bel Geddes Designs America“. Each member receives one free ticket for this event.

Harry Ransom Center

Shakespeare. Keats. Tennyson. The University of Texas at Austin had already acquired manuscripts and first editions by these notable authors by the time Harry Huntt Ransom founded the Humanities Research Center in 1957. Rather than continue to mine the Renaissance and Romantic eras for artifacts, Ransom ushered the archives into the 20th century by obtaining the collections of literary legends such as James Joyce and Dylan Thomas. Under the curatorial eye of current director Thomas F. Staley, the facility––known these days as the Harry Ransom Center––includes the archives of Robert De Niro and David Mamet, and the Woodward and Bernstein Watergate papers.

All told, the center contains 36 million leaves of manuscript, 1 million rare books, 5 million photographs, and 100,000 works of art, which, according to Frommer's, are available for any visitor's perusal. Inside the building's galleries, exhibitions showcase material alongside permanently displayed items such as one of five complete copies of the Gutenburg Bible. The Harry Ransom Center also hosts a range of public and academic programs, events, and symposia annually.

Harry Ransom Center

Shakespeare. Keats. Tennyson. The University of Texas at Austin had already acquired manuscripts and first editions by these notable authors by the time Harry Huntt Ransom founded the Humanities Research Center in 1957. Rather than continue to mine the Renaissance and Romantic eras for artifacts, Ransom ushered the archives into the 20th century by obtaining the collections of literary legends such as James Joyce and Dylan Thomas. Under the curatorial eye of current director Stephen Enniss, the facility––known these days as the Harry Ransom Center––includes the archives of Robert De Niro and David Mamet, Magnum Photos, David Foster Wallace, Ed Ruscha, and the Woodward and Bernstein Watergate papers.

All told, the center contains 42 million leaves of manuscript, 1 million rare books, 5 million photographs, and 100,000 works of art, which, according to Frommer's, are available for any visitor's perusal. Inside the building's galleries, exhibitions showcase material alongside permanently displayed items such as one of five complete copies of the Gutenburg Bible. The Harry Ransom Center also hosts a range of public and academic programs, events, and symposia annually.

Reviews

Ransom and his colleagues over the decades have collected some of the very finest books, manuscripts, and print and paper materials in the world.

Sandy K., TripAdvisor, 6/17/12

Indeed, the collection's value is in its strategic breadth, as it features many notable writers in correspondence with one another.

The Economist 6/28/11
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    University of Texas - Austin

    300 W 21st St.

    Austin, Texas 78713

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In a Nutshell

Museum with collections of more than 36 million leaves of manuscript, 1 million rare books, and 5 million photographs

The Fine Print

Expires Oct 16th, 2012. Limit 2 per person, may buy multiple additional as gifts. Valid only for option purchased. New members only. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

Experiences that expand cultural awareness, such as museums, tours, and literature
For those who welcome indoor activities and entertainment