$20 for $40 Worth of Thai Cuisine at Kanlaya Thai Cuisine

Downtown - Penn Quarter - Chinatown

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In a Nutshell

Tropical cocktails complement traditional curries, fried rice, and noodle dishes with meat, seafood, and tofu

The Fine Print

Expires 90 days after purchase. Limit 1 per person, may buy 1 additional as gift. Limit 1 per table. Valid only for option purchased. Reservation required. Dine-in only. Must purchase 1 food item. Tax and gratuity not included. Not valid with other offers and specials. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

Thai cuisine is intense and complicated, like the reasons your uncle is staying with us for a while. Make room for this Groupon.

$20 for $40 Worth of Thai Cuisine for Two or More

The menu features spicy green curry with chicken ($12), fried mahi-mahi with chili, garlic, and basil ($19), and pineapple fried rice with tofu and mixed vegetables ($10).

Kanlaya Thai Cuisine

After strolling past clusters of Chinese eateries and shops, it might be a bit surprising to find an authentic Thai restaurant in the heart of Chinatown. The aroma wafting out of Kanlaya Thai Cuisine’s kitchen is unmistakably one of Thai cooking—a tangy mixture of basil, chili, black bean spice, and kaffir lime leaves. The fragrance only grows stronger and more enticing upon entering the bright, clean dining room and taking a seat at one of the glossy wood tabletops. Attentive servers bustle across the hardwood floors of the elegant space, taking orders, making suggestions, and noting diners’ spice preferences. Bartenders dart about behind a tiny corner bar, doling out imported beers and garnishing fruity cocktails with umbrellas and fresh fruit.

Meanwhile, in the kitchen, chefs are hard at work, folding natural ingredients into a sweeping array of aromatic traditional dishes. Using time-honored Thai cooking techniques, the chefs whip up fiery coconut curries, tangy fried rice, and noodle dishes with meat, seafood, and tofu. To craft their specialty pottery shrimp—a favorite of food critic Robert Shoffner of the Washingtonian—the chefs simmer shrimp, cellophane noodles, napa cabbage, and mushrooms in exotic spices. The chefs take great care in the presentation of their dishes, decorating meats with swirls of carrot flowers, serving rice in bowls made of pineapple halves, and dishing pad thai noodles onto plates made of Renaissance oil paintings.

For those looking to get out of the house with the ladies