$22 Ticket to the King Tut Exhibit, Plus 3-D Movie ($38.21 Value)

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In a Nutshell

  • 10 galleries with 130+ artifacts
  • New scientific findings
  • Limited-engagement exhibit ends soon
  • Last chance to see exhibit before it returns to Egypt

The Fine Print

Expires Nov 15th, 2010. Limit 8 per person, may buy multiple as gifts. Valid weekdays after 2pm; weekends after 5:30pm. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

Ancient Egyptians carefully preserved their dead so that spirit and flesh would reunite in the afterlife and continue daily routines of data entry, laundry folding, and operating fantasy-javelin leagues. Unwrap your binding cloths and rise with today's Groupon: for $22, you get one ticket (a $38.21 value, including tax) to the King Tut Exhibit plus entrance to Mummies3D, a 3-D journey into the secrets of the pharaoh, Egypt, and its royal tombs, at the Discovery Times Square Exposition. This deal is valid Mondays through Fridays after 2 p.m. and Saturdays and Sundays after 5:30 p.m. until November 15. Sunday through Thursday, the last museum entry is at 6:30, and the exhibit closes at 8 p.m. On Fridays and Saturdays, the last museum entry is at 8:30 p.m., and the exhibit closes at 10 p.m.

The King Tut exhibit brings the treasures of the boy pharaoh and his kin back to New York one final time before the artifacts are returned to their ancestral homeland. Nestled among the bustle of the Discovery TSX, bear witness to more than 130 artifacts displayed in 10 galleries culled from the famous tomb of King Tutankhamen, as well as other Egyptian sites of the 18th Dynasty. This dynasty flourished over a 100-year period that many consider the "golden age" of Egyptian power, artistry, and milk pasteurization. Get an up-close gander at 50 of Tut's burial objects, the very same gilded and glittering chunks of antiquity that stunned discoverer Howard Carter in 1922. Items on display include Tut's royal diadem and one of the four canopic coffinettes, inlaid with rich gold and precious stones, which contained his mummified internal organs.

The archaeological record left behind by the ancient Egyptians is one of the most extensive in recorded history and has shaped the doughy dreams of adventurous children, alien-conspiracy theorists, and feverish, wild-eyed English noblemen for much of the modern era. In addition to the artifacts on display, the exhibit provides all manner of information on the beliefs and funerary processes of ancient Egypt, as well as new scientific findings about King Tut's genetics and manner of death.

Reviews

Since returning to New York for the first time in 31 years, the King Tut Exhibit at the Discovery Times Square Exposition has been featured on NJ.com. NY1's story, complete with video, says:

  • Come January, the artifacts return to Egypt forever. So run, don't walk like an Egyptian, to see them while you can. – NY1

Yelpers give the Discovery Times Square Exposition a three-star average, and have this to say about the King Tut Exhibit:

  • The exhibit itself had lots of artifacts, historical facts and it kept your attention. It wasn't overpowering or too much to read like some exhibits can be. It was really cool to see the video of Howard Carter bringing back the artifacts he discovered in the tomb and to see newspaper headlines announcing the discovery. – Elaine K.
  • It was both educational and interesting. The artifacts at the exhibit are incredible. The replica of King Tut's body is also so interesting. They also show how they discovered King Tut's father with his bone DNA. You should definitely check it out. – Margarita V.

Discovery Times Square

Unlike more traditional museums, Discovery Times Square does much more than simply display artifacts. The space, located in the building once occupied by the New York Times printing presses, encourages visitors to learn through interactive, sensory exhibits. Past shows have taken guests inside the Titanic’s final wreck site, Da Vinci’s ingenious inventions, and the vast collection of riches and bandages owned by King Tut. More than a museum, DTS has featured exhibitions of unparalleled breadth, including Pompeii: The Exhibit, Dead Sea Scrolls: The Exhibition, Terracotta Warriors: Defenders of China’s First Emperor, and most recently The Art of the Brick.