90-Minute In-Home Cooking Demonstration for Two from Marceda's Southern Pride (51% Off). Four Options Available.

from $39
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Cooks teach by using a hands-on approach, which is more effective than mailing students a box filled with flour, eggs, some matches, and a note that says "cookies?" Get your hands dirty with this Groupon.

Choose from Four Options

$39 for a 90-minute in-home cooking demonstration for two ($80 value). Choose from the following dishes:

  • Pineapple-mango grilled chicken with spanish rice
  • Smoked salmon with zucchini and squash chips
  • Southern pork chops with butter-cinnamon sweet-potato wedges
  • Spinach lasagna with garlic bread

Smoked Meats: Preserved in Flavor

The smoky, complex flavor of smoked meats is the result of an age-old process. Read on to learn more about the flavorful shroud that envelops your meal before it's served.

Though their invention was evidently not recorded, an origin story for smoked meats isn’t difficult to dream up. The easiest way to preserve meats is to dry them, and, in a chimneyless cave or hut, why not hang them above the fire? While they dried, the smoke would also shoo off insects and, as it turned out, make the surface of the meat acidic enough to yank the welcome mat out from under microorganisms’ grimy feet. And then there'd be the flavor, surely a treasured luxury in a world before imported spices.

Though the technology has advanced, the principles of smoking meats remain the same today. Simply bathing meats in the smoke of flavorful hardwoods at temperatures of no higher than 100 degree Fahrenheit results in cold smoking. Cold smoking doesn’t actually cook food—it merely adds flavor to meats and authenticity to firefighter costumes. To keep temperatures low, the smoke must be generated in a chamber separate from the meat.

Hot smoking exposes meats to smoke directly from woods burning in a controlled environment over an extended period of time, usually at around 120 to 180 degrees Fahrenheit. This “low and slow” approach is an ideal way to prepare typically cheap and tough cuts of meat such as brisket or pork. The long heating process helps break down the fats and connective tissues in these cuts, and the lower temperatures keep moisture in the meat for a tender, succulent texture. Meats that won’t reach pasteurization temperature in the smoker, or won’t be finished via another cooking method, are generally prepared with pink salt (sodium nitrite) to ward off spores that might otherwise invade the relatively low-temperature, low-oxygen environment.

In a Nutshell

Chef visits homes to teach clients how to cook satisfying meals—often with a southern flair—such as pork chops with sweet-potato wedges

The Fine Print

Expires 90 days after purchase. Limit 1 per person, may buy 1 additional as gift. Valid only for option purchased. Limit 1 per visit. Appointment required. 24-hr cancellation notice required. Valid only within 20 miles of 30067. All cooking utensils, spices and tools provided. Main ingredients not provided. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

Culinary tools and activities, from cooking demos to kitchen appliances
Great date experiences and other fun two-person activities