$10 Donation to the Museum of Latin American Art

Give as a Gift
Over 30 bought
Limited quantity available

In a Nutshell

Donations help send one child to a summer art camp full of hands-on crafts and projects in the visual, martial, and culinary arts

The Fine Print

100% of donations go directly to the Museum of Latin American Art. *** Donations are automatically applied. See Grassroots FAQs that apply to this campaign. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

The Issue: Creativity in Young People

Business leaders agree that creativity is a skill jobseekers need if they’re to thrive in the coming decades. In fact, 72% of business leaders surveyed by Americans for the Arts placed it as the top attribute they look for when hiring. At the same time, creative programs such as art, music, and drama are facing diminished budgets at schools nationwide due to an increased focus on standardized testing. Furthermore, access to arts education is significantly lower among African-American and Hispanic communities—two populations frequently underserved by school systems.

The Campaign: Sending Children to a Summer Art Camp

All donations to this Grassroots campaign will be used by the Museum of Latin American Art to contribute to the creative education of underserved Long Beach and Los Angeles County children. For every $150 raised, the organization can provide a full scholarship for one child to attend the bilingual Summer Art Camp. There, children spend five full days learning about Latin American art through hands-on projects and crafts in the visual, martial, and culinary arts.

Museum of Latin American Art

While wandering the Museum of Latin American Art's permanent collection of works—from artists native to 20 Latin American countries—it might come as a surprise that the space was once home to a roller-skating rink and a silent-movie studio. Its transformation into one of the country's only museums dedicated to modern and contemporary Latin American art was the work of physician, philanthropist, and patron of the arts Dr. Robert Gumbiner. He acquired the properties and founded the museum in 1996, revamping the Hippodrome into galleries alive with Latin American music, paintings, and video.

Since that time, the museum has doubled in size, adding a 15,000-square-foot sculpture garden and expanding its collection to include masters such as Rufino Tamayo, Roberto Sebastián Matta, Los Carpinteros, and Tunga. The site now serves as a beacon of Latin American culture, showcasing artists who made names for themselves in their own countries but may not be well known in the United States.

Beyond the eye-catching exhibitions, which have been featured in the Los Angeles Times, the museum offers educational programs and events such as concerts, film showings, and children’s art camps. Each is an outgrowth of the museum’s mission to stimulate the intellect and cultivate an appreciation for Latin America’s contributions to the world of art.



Support great causes by giving back or paying it forward
Experiences that expand cultural awareness, such as museums, tours, and literature