$10 for Newseum Single-Day Admission

Downtown - Penn Quarter - Chinatown

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In a Nutshell

  • Interactive exhibits
  • Historical artifacts
  • Evocative images
  • Visiting exhibits

The Fine Print

Expires Dec 31st, 2009. Valid for 1 single-day Newseum admission. No re-entry. Not valid with other offers. No cash value. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

Jump to: Reviews | The History of News, in Which Movies are Reported as Facts

The news media is your connection to your fellow human beings who are rocketing to the moon or hiding in their attics. See how history is captured with today's Groupon: you'll get $10 admission to the Newseum, a $19.95 value. At the Newseum, you'll be thrust into a Zen-like communion with the very fonts of the global supply of information on historical happenings and magnificent milestones. You'll also get access to permanent and visiting exhibits, as well as theaters, historic papers, and tons of artifacts while taking in stunning views of the Capitol.

Each time you flip the channel, surf the web, turn the dial, or unfold the paper for your news, you rely on the history-shaping people and technologies of the news industry to keep you entertained, in the know, and able to follow topical conversations without relying on wordless nods. Learn what it’s like to be a TV reporter when you step in front of the camera with a microphone in the NBC News Interactive Newsroom, and check out close-up views of historic headlines about Jesse James and other notorious newsmakers in the News Corporation News History Gallery.

Bring a notebook to record your thoughts and a friend to share your emotions as you peruse the Pulitzer Prize Gallery, full of evocative photos that capture the history's heroism and tragedy in the clearest way possible until moving photographs are invented. Survey eight 12-foot-tall concrete sections of the Berlin Wall and other impactful artifacts, such as a ballot box from the 1994 South African elections, which ended apartheid, and the door from the Watergate office break-in.

Even if you've already visited the Newseum, there's always something new to see. In Manhunt: Chasing Lincoln's Killer, you'll get an in-depth look at news coverage during the search for President Lincoln's murderer. Music fans will delight in Woodstock at 40: The Rise of Music Journalism, an exhibit devoted to examining the legendary festival and its contribution to how music is covered by journalists today.

Reviews

The Newseum is featured in the Washington Post, the New York Times, and USA Today. One of TripAdvisor's top 10 attractions in Washington DC, the Newseum earns 4.5 owl eyes from TripAdvisors and Yelpers give it four stars:

  • ... a significant new player in the city's crowded cultural scene. – Michael O'Sullivan, Washington Post
  • Courtesy of the deft exhibitions created by Ralph Appelbaum Associates, the Newseum is an appealing example of how a museum can both teach and entertain with clever use of images, interactive displays and compact explanations that will repay serious reading while offering edutainment to the many schoolchildren expected to visit. – Edward Rothstein, New York Times
  • Absolutely loved this museum. We spent over 4 hours here and could've stayed longer. The exhibits are wonderfully presented, very informative and great for all ages. – doctorbubba, TripAdvisor

The History of News, in Which Movies are Reported as Facts

Today’s Groupon brings you the history of news. Before you visit the Newseum, bone up on these important moments in news history:

  • Creation of Universe, 0 BC: You only needed one Man Upstairs to record the first 4,000 years of human history: King James of England.
  • 1200–1600: Very little contemporary reporting was done at the time; the most complete history of the period is called The Lord of The Rings.
  • 1730: Founding father Ben Franklin publishes The Pennsylvania Gazette, in which he invents the personal ad for the purpose of cheating on his wife.
  • 1998: Hard hitting newsmen like Peter Jennings and Tom Brokaw are duped into reporting the plot of the film Armageddon as fact.

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