$99 for a 3.5-Hour Intro to Jewelry-Making Class at Revere Academy of Jewelry Arts($225 Value)

Downtown

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In a Nutshell

Students use included materials to make their own brass pendant dog tag while working at a traditional jewelry bench inside a pro studio

The Fine Print

Expires Feb 13th, 2013. Limit 1 per person, may buy multiple as gifts. Limit 1 per visit. Not valid until 8/20/12. Reservation required. No parking available on-site. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

People celebrate special occasions by decorating things with baubles, as evidenced by hanging ornaments on Christmas trees and emptying drums of diamonds over winning coaches. Be a gem with this Groupon.

$99 for a 3.5-Hour Jewelry-Making 101 Class ($225 Value)

Students design and make their own brass pendant dog tag and use stamps to add a custom message, all at a traditional jewelry bench. Instructors demonstrate basic metalworking skills, such as filing, stamping, and hand finishing, which students immediately apply to their projects. The materials and tools—including files, drills, and punches—are all included.

Revere Academy of Jewelry Arts

Master goldsmith Alan Revere founded the Revere Academy of Jewelry Arts in 1979, creating a space where gifted metalsmiths could pass on their skills to burgeoning jewelry-makers. Today, more than a dozen expert instructors form the faculty, introducing hobbyists and hopeful professionals alike to the fundamentals. The facilities include magnified video feeds that broadcast larger-than-life demonstrations of the teacher performing small and delicate processes, a feat of observation that once required each student to shrink to the size of a pixie. The studio is complete with all of the tools and finishing equipment necessary for students to bring their bejeweled creations to shimmering fruition.

Revere Academy of Jewelry Arts

Master goldsmith Alan Revere founded the Revere Academy of Jewelry Arts in 1979, creating a space where gifted metalsmiths could pass on their skills to burgeoning jewelry-makers. Today, more than a dozen expert instructors form the faculty, introducing hobbyists and hopeful professionals alike to the fundamentals. The facilities include magnified video feeds that broadcast larger-than-life demonstrations of the teacher performing small and delicate processes, a feat that once required each student to bring their own periscope to class. In the tool room, students will find a blasting unit, magnetic polisher, and other essentials needed to bring their bejeweled creations to shimmering fruition.

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