One Dozen Bagels and Cream Cheese or Five Bagel Sandwiches at Seattle Bagel @ Pike Place Market (Up to 53% Off)

Pike Place Market

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In a Nutshell

Kettle-boiled bagels are shaped into sandwiches, calzones, and bagel dogs, then stuffed with fillings such as jalapeños and italian sausage

The Fine Print

Expires Apr 3rd, 2013. Limit 1 per person, may buy 1 additional as a gift. Limit 1 per visit. Valid only for option purchased. Valid only at listed location. Must use promotional value in 1 visit. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

Bagels aren't the only breakfast food available, but they are the only one that doubles as the steering wheel of a tiny bread car. Don't do donuts with this Groupon.

Choose Between Two Options

  • $7 for one dozen bagels and a tub of cream cheese (a $15 value)
  • $15 for a punch card for five bagel sandwiches, bagel dogs, or calzones (up to a $30 value)

When you step through the doors of the historic Pike Place Market, you'll breathe in the scent of fresh fish and the lingering smell of sugar-dusted donuts. Aromas of fresh-baked bagels cut through the surrounding sensory web, leading you to the Seattle Bagel counter and its rows of warm calzones, bagel sandwiches, and bagel dogs, each stuffed with a variety of scintillating flavors including pesto, onion, and melted pepper jack cheese. Breakfast calzones are a particular favorite in the market, featuring jalapeño-bagel dough rolled around a filling of scrambled eggs, cheese, bacon, and sausage.

Seattle Bagel

AJ Ghambari was born and raised in the Seattle coffee and food industry. His father owns the Cherry Street Coffee House and taught him how to make and sell quality food. One of its primary suppliers was Seattle Bagel Bakery, which would deliver kettle-boiled bagels to the coffeehouse every morning. When the bakery's owner told AJ he was not sure if it would survive, AJ knew he had to act. He learned the bagel-making process and slowly began taking over at Seattle Bagel, overseeing the process of kettle-boiling each bagel. He now manages the business as it expands into a dual retail and wholesale operation across the city.

Making each bagel from scratch, bakers mix the dough by hand using flour that was sustainably farmed and distributed by a co-op of local farmers. They then form the bagels, plump them, and leave them to mature overnight as the flavors settle, the bread thickens, and the yeast stops throwing temper tantrums. At 4 a.m. the next morning, they throw the bagels into a kettle of boiling water to crisp the crust and leave a rich, chewy interior. Finally, the bakers top the bagels with sesame seeds, cheese, or onions, bake them in shelf ovens, and deliver them to local retailers by 6:30 a.m. The early delivery comes just in time for the morning rush of customers scrambling for bagels flavored with olive oil and pesto, bacon and cheddar, or sweet orange and cranberry—all of which can be smothered with housemade cream cheese or dry-rubbed lox.

Uncomplicated dining experiences that won’t waste your time or budget
Small treats such as cupcakes, magazine subscriptions, and deli punch cards