1-Day Football or Cheer Camp for 1 or 2 Children at Sports Gone National League on Friday, 6/20 (Up to 51% Off)

Jackson Park

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In a Nutshell

Kids aged 4–14 learn football fundamentals or cheer training at a 90-minute Friday-night session led by elite youth & high-school coaches

The Fine Print

Expires Jun 20th, 2014. Registration required. Merchant's standard cancellation policy applies (any fees not to exceed Groupon price). Limit 1 per person, may buy 3 additional as gifts. Valid only for option purchased. All goods or services must be used by the same person. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

It's relaxing to sit at home watching TV, but then you'll never know what's on other places' TVs. See what's out there with this Groupon.

Choose Between Two Options

  • $20 for a one-day football or cheer camp for one child ($40 value)
  • $39 for a one-day football or cheer camp for two children ($80 value)

On Friday, June 20, kids aged 4–14 gather for a Friday Night Lights football camp to learn the fundamentals of the game. Or, kids aged 4–14 can explore techniques at cheer camp from elite youth and high school coaches from Chicago. Both camps take place at Jackson Park from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Every participant gets a T-shirt.

Trick Plays in American Football: Game-Winning Gambits

They might not happen in most games, but trick plays are some of the most exciting moments in football. Learn about some celebrated trick plays with Groupon's examination.

Sometimes in life, being lucky is better than being good. And sometimes in football, being deceptive is better than both. Trick plays capitalize on this logic, using unconventional strategies and formations to catch the opposition off guard. It’s a high-risk, high-reward approach: if a trick play works, it really works, resulting in huge yardage gains or even a touchdown, but if it doesn't, the consequence can be a devastating loss of yards or an offensive turnover. Because of such uncertainty, trick plays are rarely used, but when they do happen, it makes for some of the most exciting—and memorable—moments in sports.

On the final play of their 2007 bowl game, the Boise State Broncos deployed the Statue of Liberty, a ruse in which the quarterback drops back to pass and fakes a throw, sliding the ball behind his back to a teammate sprinting behind him. If all goes as planned—as it did for the Broncos, who scored the game-winning touchdown on the play—the defense gets caught out of position, leaving nothing but open space in front of the ball carrier. Similar smoke and mirrors were used during the 1984 college championship game, when the Nebraska Cornhuskers ran what's known as the fumblerooski. Quarterback Turner Gill received the snap, but immediately—and unbeknownst to the Miami defense—placed the ball on the ground. Nebraska lineman Dean Steinkuhler inconspicuously snatched up the ball and ran into the end zone, celebrating the subterfuge. The play has since been banned in college football, though it had already been outlawed at the professional level since the 1960s.

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    Jackson Park

    6401 S Stony Island Ave.

    Chicago, Illinois 60637

    773-209-1117

    Get Directions

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