$15 for $30 Worth of Japanese Fare at Sumo Japanese Steakhouse

Northwest Side

Give as a Gift
Over 880 bought
Limited quantity available

In a Nutshell

Teppanyaki chefs dazzle diners while cooking chicken, steak & seafood on hibachi grill alongside menu of sushi rolls.

The Fine Print

Expires Aug 8th, 2012. Limit 1 per person. Limit 1 per table. Not valid for the purchase of alcohol. Dine-in only. Not valid for special items, lunch, or on holidays. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

Eating authentically prepared food lets you taste the very essence of a country without chewing on its national flag. Salute global cuisine with this Groupon.

$15 for $30 Worth of Japanese Fare

The menu includes hibachi fare such as filet mignon ($30) and grilled shrimp ($25), which come with japanese onion soup and salad. Sushi selections include the Sunrise roll of cucumber and crab topped with salmon, avocado, and sesame seeds ($9).

Sumo Japanese Steakhouse

Twelve chefs clad in black uniforms and red hats stand at attention over tableside hibachis. All eyes on them, they start to play with their food: the culinary wizards wave lobster tails at guests, set onions aflame, and flip shrimp high in the air to land in their tall hats. “It is not just about the food, it’s about the show,” says Sumo Japanese Steakhouse owner Brad Meltzer. “The show brings you in and the food brings you back.”

Prior to landing on the hibachi grill, beef is butchered in-house and dressed in its Sunday best. Filet mignon shares grilling space with salmon, chicken, tuna, and scallops dipped in house-made ginger sauce. Meltzer and a small army of trained sushi chefs designed their menu of more than two dozen nigiri and sashimi rolls to please even the prickliest taste buds. Meltzer himself favors the 210 roll, a cyclone of scallops, shrimp, and crab slathered in sweet-and-spicy sauce and topped with crabstick, eel sauce, spicy mayo, and a snowfall of tempura flakes.

Sumo Japanese Steakhouse

Twelve chefs clad in black uniforms and red hats stand at attention over tableside hibachis. All eyes on them, they start to play with their food: the culinary wizards wave lobster tails at guests, set onions aflame, and flip shrimp high in the air to land in their tall hats. “It is not just about the food, it’s about the show,” says Sumo Japanese Steakhouse owner Brad Meltzer. “The show brings you in and the food brings you back.”

Prior to landing on the hibachi grill, beef is butchered in-house and dressed in its Sunday best. Filet mignon shares grilling space with salmon, chicken, tuna, and scallops dipped in house-made ginger sauce. Meltzer and a small army of trained sushi chefs designed their menu of more than two dozen nigiri and sashimi rolls to please even the prickliest taste buds. Meltzer himself favors the 210 roll, a cyclone of scallops, shrimp, and crab slathered in sweet-and-spicy sauce and topped with crabstick, eel sauce, spicy mayo, and a snowfall of tempura flakes.

For those looking to get out of the house with the ladies