Laotian and Thai Food at Thai Lao Restaurant (Half Off). Two Options Available.

Atlantic-University

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Ethnic restaurants provide a taste of variety for everyone not lucky enough to travel frequently or secretly live in the United Nations food court. Have a far-flung feast with this Groupon.

Choose Between Two Options

  • $10 for $20 worth of Laotian and Thai food
  • $20 for $40 worth of Laotian and Thai food for four or more people

Try signature dishes such as the steak brisket with spicy sauce and sticky rice ($13.99), or pad thai. Made solely at the Rochester location, the traditional Laotian dish kao-phoon, takes 3-hours to craft and consists of a spicy, slow-cooked red coconut curry with sweet cabbage and bean sprouts ($7.95). See the full menu.

Thai Lao Restaurant

Tom Xomvimane traveled a long way to bring authentic Southeast Asian cuisine to Rochester. As Karen Miltner of the Democrat and Chronicle reported, the Thai Lao Restaurant owner was born in Laos and lived briefly in Thailand before moving to America as an adolescent. His parents taught him how to cook, and by the ripe old age of 8, Xomvimane was independently crafting his own meals. He mastered traditional techniques, such as steaming sticky rice in bamboo baskets, and employs the same methods at his restaurant, whose April 2012 opening was heralded by the city of Rochester’s website.

Xomvimane is on a mission to introduce area residents to Laotian specialties such as the kao-phoon: a slow-simmered curry dish with coconut milk and chicken or cornish hen served over rice noodles. When the Democrat and Chronicle reporter tasted the signature dish, she wrote that it packed a spicy punch, adding "the fresh herbs (spearmint and Thai basil) brought cool comfort, and fresh mung bean sprouts even more so." A master of Asian-style barbecue, including slow-marinated brisket, Xomvimane also keeps the menu stocked with plentiful vegetarian options such as the cabbage- and peanut-topped spicy papaya salad and baby-back ribs, which according to local legislature, are technically fruit.

Thai Lao Restaurant

Tom Xomvimane traveled a long way to bring authentic Southeast Asian cuisine to Rochester. As Karen Miltner of the Democrat and Chronicle reported, the Thai Lao Restaurant owner was born in Laos and lived briefly in Thailand before moving to America as an adolescent. His parents taught him how to cook, and by the ripe old age of 8, Xomvimane was independently crafting his own meals. He mastered traditional techniques, such as steaming sticky rice in bamboo baskets, and employs the same methods at his restaurant, whose April 2012 opening was heralded by the city of Rochester’s website.

Xomvimane is on a mission to introduce area residents to Laotian specialties such as the kao-phoon: a slow-simmered curry dish with coconut milk and chicken or cornish hen served over rice noodles. When the Democrat and Chronicle reporter tasted the signature dish, she wrote that it packed a spicy punch, adding "the fresh herbs (spearmint and Thai basil) brought cool comfort, and fresh mung bean sprouts even more so." A master of Asian-style barbecue, including slow-marinated brisket, Xomvimane also keeps the menu stocked with plentiful vegetarian options such as the cabbage- and peanut-topped spicy papaya salad and baby-back ribs, which according to local legislature, are technically fruit.

  1. A

    Atlantic-University

    309 University Ave,

    Rochester, New York 14607

    585-454-4882

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In a Nutshell

Southeast Asian dishes such as steak brisket and spicy papaya salad inspired by the owner's childhood in Laos and Thailand

The Fine Print

Expires Feb 13th, 2013. Limit 1 per person. Limit 1 per table. Valid only for option purchased. Reservation required. Not valid for alcohol. Dine-in only. Not valid with any other offers. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.