$15 for $30 Worth of Peruvian Cuisine and Drinks at Totoritas

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In a Nutshell

Ceviche and other Peruvian dishes embrace influences from Spanish, French, African, Chinese, and Japanese cuisines

The Fine Print

Expires Feb 20th, 2013. Limit 2 per person, may buy 2 additional as gifts. Limit 1 per table. Dine-in only. Must use promotional value in 1 visit. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

Family members who eat together stay together, and family members who get stranded on an island together begin imagining one another as food. Have a family meal with this Groupon.

$15 for $30 Worth of Peruvian Cuisine and Drinks

The menu leads off with six varieties of ceviche, such as shrimp and fish ($10.45+), before exploring the breadth of Peruvian cuisine through breaded steak with plantains and eggs ($9.65) and chicken breasts with onions and tomatoes ($8.85).

Totoritas

To reflect on Totoritas’ menu is to wade through the effect that exploration and globalization have had on the world’s cultures over the past several centuries. Amid the pages, one can see the influences that found their way to Peruvian shores—from the cilantro introduced by the Spanish to the fried rice and saltados, or sautéed dishes, brought over with Chinese and Japanese immigrants. But to focus solely on the origins of the ingredients themselves, and their transfer from one culture to another, is to ignore how delicious they can be when combined.

Cilantro tops six varieties of ceviche to soften the bite of the lemon juice that marinates the fish and shrimp, and coats of spicy sauce dress fried and sautéed fillets to amp up their zing before they lie atop beds of rice. Plantains flank breaded chicken, and steak, fried fish, or chicken tops tacu-tacu, a classic African-Peruvian dish with beans and spices. While guests explore the crosscultural flavors, colorful paintings of landscapes dot the dining-room walls between bright copper sconces to remind eyes of the seas where fish are caught and of the fields where silverware grows.