Sightseeing in Alaska

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As the sun crests the mountains that border the Kenai River Valley, sunlight permeates the thin walls of lodge sales manager Chad Carter’s Yukon-style cabin tent, and the surrounding pine forest erupts in a chorus of birdsong. As if that weren’t enough to rouse Mr. Carter from slumber, there’s also the prospect of what he may spy when he looks out his window: a lone moose or perhaps bear cubs.

Mr. Carter, along with the rest of the Alaska Wildland Adventures staff, remain immersed in the Alaskan wilderness for the summer season, which has helped them develop an extensive knowledge of region. But even more significantly, Mr. Carter notes how the secluded environs have helped forge bonds between staff, who enjoy a close-knit community during summer months. “They become your family,” says Mr. Carter. “You go on adventures together—it’s definitely a teamwork approach here.” Guides strive to incorporate guests into that community, limiting expeditions by foot, raft, and kayak to small groups of 10 people. They also empower guests with the tools they need to navigate the region, including maps and safety tutorials. And, after a long day’s journey, they treat overnight guests to communal, home-cooked meals of Alaskan seafood.

16520 Sterling Hwy
Cooper Landing,
AK
US

Over sweeping evergreen pine forests and snow-capped mountains, the pilots from Above Alaska Aviation's FAR flight school hone their craft. FAA-certified instructors coach students in a range of specialized flight training in a fleet of 7EC Champ aircraft, as well as a PA-18 Super Cub and Cessna 180B. They train private pilot students in tailwheel aircraft from start to finish, tailwheel endorsements, and single-engine sea float ratings on the mountain lakes of Susitna Valley. Students learn the basics of flying tail-wheel aircraft?planes with landing gear on the tail?to hone skill sets, enhance their understanding of flight safety, and help them feel superior to carrier pigeons. When not teaching flight, bush pilots ferry passengers to remote wilderness areas where they can hike, fish, or hunt with rifles and bows.

22743 South Terminal Avenue
Talkeetna,
AK
US

"We don't judge a successful day on how many miles we rode, but by the smile on your face." With that motto as their driving force, the expert guides at MotoQuest play a role in each step of the tour planning—from manning the phones during initial queries to scouting out routes that's tailored to each group's comfort level. The multilingual team, who are also trained in First Aid and Professional Comedic Stand-Up, amiably lead groups of no more than 10 bikers all around the world, from Alaska to South Africa to Vietnam.

Riders board a fleet including Harley Davidson, Kawasaki, and Yamaha bikes and either follow guides down roads that veer off typical tourist paths, or pick up a road map and carve out their own epic journeys. They may also opt for hourly or weekly rentals of the motorcycles and scooters. Journeys may take riders across scenic landscapes or through bustling towns that acquaint them with the local culture.

4346 Spenard Rd
Anchorage,
AK
US

A soldier hears a rustling in the distant trees. He turns his head expecting to exchange glances with a family of squirrels or maybe a bear. Then, he hears a quick burst of air, shifts his gaze downward, and finds a splatter of blue paint on his T-shirt. Ambushes by paint-slinging sharpshooters occur regularly at Wasilla SplatterHouse Paintball, where groups gather to stage colorful tactical operations on a woodsy landscape dotted with plentiful obstacles and hiding places. While ducking under paintball fire, players crawl through cement tubes and crouch behind walls to plot their next move or patch up their multicolored wounds with whiteout. Before being unleashed onto the battlegrounds, players are supplied with paintballs and Tippmann 98 and electronic-trigger Smart Parts Vibe equipment.

1241 W Melanie Ave
Wasilla,
AK
US

Built in 1968 to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the purchase of Alaska from Russia, the Anchorage Museum’s mirrored skin now holds an immense collection of exhibits that celebrate Alaska’s history and innovations in art and science. Using grants awarded by the National Endowment for the Arts and other organizations, Anchorage Museum was able to devote four floors and a small but well-appointed fourth dimension to art, cultural history, natural history, and science and technology—all represented by more than 25,000 objects.

Through a series of permanent exhibits, visitors embark on a cultural and geological voyage. More than 600 Alaskan Native artifacts on loan from the Smithsonian Institution join miniature dioramas of indigenous lifestyles in illuminating the cultures that first shaped the area, while other collections peer into the gold rush era, World War II, and the process of becoming a state. Itchy hands find relief in the Imaginarium Discovery Center, a playground for DIY discovery where visitors of all ages can touch sea stars, shoot air cannons, and learn more about what makes a volcano erupt or the aurora borealis cast its eerie glow.

625 C St
Anchorage,
AK
US

Amateur pilots can learn how to fly Cessna planes, Piper J3 Cubs, and Maule MX7s during float ratings, bush courses, and tailwheel training with Legends Aviation. For those who'd rather see the sights than take the controls, tours traverse some of Alaska's most notable landscapes, including Denali National Park, the Mount Spurr volcano, and the Knik Glacier. Soar over the icy peaks and deep valleys or hire a plane to take you to official checkpoints along the Iditarod Trail to look for abandoned foam fingers.

HC 89 Box 109
Willow,
AK
US