Museums in Apache Junction


$12 for Admission for Four to Halle Heart Children's Museum ($20 Value)

Halle Heart Children's Museum

Tempe

Exhibits teach kids how the circulatory system works and how choices in diet and exercise can help the heart grow stronger

$20 $12

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Museum Visit for Four, Six, or Eight at Arizona Pop Culture Experience (Up to 55% Off)

Arizona Pop Culture Experience

Phoenix

Museum with more than 13,000 action figures, comic books, and pieces of memorabilia covers the last 50 to 60 years of pop culture

$20 $10

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$16 for Admission for Up to Four People to the The Hall of Flame Fire Museum (Up to $28 Value)

The Hall of Flame Fire Museum

Phoenix

Nearly an acre of exhibits trace international firefighting history, from old-fashioned fire engines to helmets from around the world

$28 $16

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Adult Admission for Two or Four to Desert Caballeros Western Museum (Up to 47% Off)

Desert Caballeros Western Museum

Wickenburg

Explore artifacts of the Old West and Arizona culture including a collection of paintings and sculptures made by Western women

$18 $9.50

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Admission for Two or Eight at The University of Arizona Museum of Art (Up to 45% Off)

The University of Arizona Museum of Art

Ward 6

University art museum houses collections that span five centuries, featuring works by everyone from Bartolomé to Pollock

$10 $6

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One-Year Individual or Family Membership to the Arizona State Museum on the University of Arizona Campus

Arizona State Museum

University of Arizona

Museum explores Southwest Indian history and contemporary life through 3,000,000 artifacts, film, interactive exhibits & immersive programs

$40 $18

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Select Local Merchants

The sprawling Superstition Mountain Range has been inhabited for more than 9,000 years, but its landscape has remained the same until relatively recently. In the 19th century American settlers moved in, driven by rumors of a bountiful gold mine. The Lost Dutchman Mine spawned a range of new settlements alongside existing American Indian sites here. Though the mine's inhabitants?and the cowboy hats they wore?are long gone, their story lives on at the Superstition Mountain Museum, a 12.5-acre interactive outdoor museum and nature walk dedicated to preserving the area's history. Full-scale recreations of 19th-century buildings include a stage-coach shop, barber shop, 20-stamp gold ore crusher, and the church-turned-film museum Elvis Memorial Chapel. Each building transports visitors back in time with the help of exhibits featuring authentic artifacts and documents such as ancient rock samples that reveal local geology, or art and household items depicting American Indian life.
4087 E Apache Trl.
Apache Junction,
AZ
US
Mesa Arts Center curates artistic goings-on inside a sleek structure filled with four theaters, five art galleries, and 14 art studios. Graced by the likes of Yo-Yo Ma and Bill Cosby, the stages of the facility's theaters showcase a cultural cocktail of live music, Broadway, dance, and comedy performances. Grooming the next generation of artisans with the help of advanced equipment, seasoned instructors teach everything from acting and beading to woodworking and welding during art classes tailored to both kids and adults. For inspiration, students and visitors can stroll through the galleries of the Mesa Contemporary Arts Museum for glimpses at a revolving selection of contemporary art from international artists. Speckled with gardens, shapely architecture, and colorful lighting, the facility?s modern grounds welcome guests for everyday visits or annual events and festivals.
1 E Main St.
Mesa,
AZ
US
Self-expression and imagination have no age limits. That's the idea behind i.d.e.a. Museum, a gathering place for youngsters to explore art and their own creativity. Rotating exhibitions, which have included glow-in-the-dark portraits and bead art, stimulate children's imaginations as well as the sense of sight. Guests can follow the spark of inspiration and create their own magnum opuses during art classes or in the museum's interactive play area, Artville. Decorated with giant-size paint brushes and other art equipment, Artville presents kids with a colorful array of play stations and even a performance arts center to stage productions of Waiting for Go Dog Go.
150 W. Pepper Place
Mesa,
AZ
US
Four-and-a-half billion. That’s how many years of history fits into the Arizona Museum of Natural History’s 80,000 square feet. The Origins gallery orients extremely disoriented visitors with a timeline that traces the most significant events in the history of the cosmos and planet Earth. From there, visitors browse the museum’s 60,000 artifacts, such as the Dinosaur Hall’s T-rex skull and full skeleton of an adolescent triceratops. On the three-story Dinosaur Mountain—flash floods gush every 23 minutes and endanger roaring replicas of dinosaurs such as a stegosaurus and tyrannosaurus. Though chockfull of dinosaurs, not everything at the museum is saurian in nature. The museum’s Mesoamerica and South America section, for instance, focuses on artifacts from ancient cultures, such as the Maya and the early civilizations of Central Mexico. In exhibitions on Arizona’s history, guests can explore the labyrinthine Lost Dutchman Mine, search for gold in the History Courtyard, and get locked away in an actual territorial jail that used to house outlaws, cattle rustlers, and a guy who said the jailer's chaps made his thighs look fat. In addition to all the museum’s historical relics, there are living creatures on display, including a Gila monster and a soft-shelled turtle named Tom.
53 N MacDonald
Mesa,
AZ
US
There’s little left in Tucson to suggest that back in the mid-19th-century the city served as the Southwest’s hub for highway robbers. But it's a fact that the area hosted a string of stagecoach holdups and served as the starting point for Wyatt Earp’s infamous vendetta ride. At the Arizona History Museum, relics stand testament to this harrowed past, including an original Concord stagecoach, not unlike those whose occupants were forced to surrender their valuables to roadside brigands. The museum doesn’t only explore infamy, though; it illuminates all the forces that took part in Tucson’s transition from Paleo-Indian hunting ground to Spanish colonial outpost to the commercial center it is today. Exhibits cover this vast span of time creatively, including a full-size replica of an underground mine that provides a glimpse into early-20th-century working conditions, hands-on exhibits that recall the day-to-day lives of Native Americans, and archaeology displays that detail the surrounding environment's history over the past 4,000 years.
1300 N College Ave
Tempe,
AZ
US
This museum houses American crafts, 3,500 ceramic pieces, and more than 5,000 prints in six exhibits and was dubbed "the single most impressive venue for contemporary art in Arizona" by Art in America magazine. Highlights of the collection include works by Georgia O’Keefe and Diego Rivera.
51 W 10th St
Tempe,
AZ
US
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