Korean Restaurants in Asbury Park

Select Local Merchants

A paneled ceiling design, stained glass, and simple wooden furniture inform the welcoming decor at the Korean Hanbat Restaurant. With an extensive menu of traditional dishes, the Zagat-rated and 2013 Michelin-recommended restaurant's Korean roots run deeper than a wide receiver whose brakes are broken. Its kitchen staff whips up plates of pajun, a scallion pancake with seafood, or bi bim kook soo, Korean-style noodles with beef and vegetables including strips of carrots, peppers, onion, and large chunks of broccoli.

53 W 35th St
New York,
NY
US

For lunch, design your own dish with a yakiniku grilling set. Try the U.S. Kobe beef set ($22), which includes 3.5-ounce portions of both Harami skirt steak and chuck rib. For non-grillers, the garlic-noodles bowl (from $8) or hot-stone-pot bibimbap (from $8) side well with an order of Kurosawa cold sake ($9). The dinner menu includes everything from grilled veggies such as fresh asparagus ($5), broccoli ($4), or garlic button mushrooms ($4) to spicy Chilean sea bass ($15). Noodle dishes including goma negi ramen or udon ($9) and chicken garlic noodles ($10) round out the menu. For dessert, save room for dorayaki ice cream ($6), in which ice cream is sandwiched between two fluffy pancakes. View complete menus for the Midtown and the East Village locations here.

34 Cooper Sq
New York,
NY
US

Kang Suh specializes in authentic Korean cuisine, and takes care to create a welcoming atmosphere surrounding every aspect of the dining experience inside. The main dining room is brightly lit and simply decorated, with firm red chairs, a charcoal gray color scheme and square dividers similar to the natural wall panels found in Korean Hanok architecture. Food is served up in a traditional Korean style, presented in clean white bowls to emphasize the colorful ingredients. Hot items, like cha dol bae gi, a thin, non-marinated beef brisket, are cooked in front of you on a circular Korean barbecue, but with over six pages of dishes to choose from, diners could spend many meals at Kang Suh without every trying the same thing twice. Order up an array of kimchi, seafood pancakes, noodle soups and more, all of which can be shared amongst family and friends in the traditional Korean style.

1250 Broadway
New York,
NY
US

Chom Chom's chefs serve up authentic Korean entrees, sushi rolls, and shareable Korean small plates, or kapas, in a chic, modern restaurant. Nimble fingers stuff homemade dumplings, and a stone bowl of dolsot bibimbap arrives to the table crowned with a fried egg. The 5,000-square-foot eatery rambles over two floors and seats 120 diners, whose optic appetites are sated by walls bedecked with yellow horizontal light fixtures and backlit cross-sections of tofu tree. Signature cocktails flood martini glasses with flavors such as green tea, lychee, and traditional soju as wooden spoons and chopsticks at each place setting lie in wait of post-meal stilt races.

40 W 56th St
New York,
NY
US

BonChon Chicken has been featured in the New York Times, Serious Eats NY, and Time-Out New York. Esquire named it Best Buffalo Hot Wings in America, and more than 110 Yelpers give it a 3.5-star average.

209 W 38th St
New York,
NY
US

Fat Buddha lures revelers in with regular drink specials and anchors them in place by filling their stomachs with dishes from a mouthwatering, Asian-inspired menu. Amid an intimate bar setting, friends gather around tables to savor a sampling of small plates, including bacon-wrapped shrimp with sweet and sour sauce ($8), flank-steak skewers ($8), and bulgogi korean barbecue with gochujang sauce ($12). Large dishes of pan-seared duck ($12) delight dinner-minded epicureans, and an entrée of black cod with a sweet miso glaze ($12) swirls taste buds in a sharkless sea of flavor. Side dishes, such as pork and shrimp shumai dumplings ($6), spicy kimchi ($3), and chili-pepper fries ($4) join forces to create meals with variety, much like eating directly from a piñata.

212 Avenue A
New York,
NY
US