Museums in Atlanta

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Visiting The Museum of Contemporary Art of Georgia isn't just about seeing works that have already been deemed important. It's also about discovering what the future of art may look like. That's because the museum showcases the visual works of not only established artists, but also emerging talent throughout the state. By investing so heavily in Georgia's artistic community and making the museum's collections available to the general public, MOCA GA strives to preserve these artists' legacies for the viewing pleasure of present and future generations. The permanent collection currently features over 920 works by more than 250 different artists, including paintings, sculptures, photography, prints, and digital works from the mid 1940s to the present day.

MOCA GA's staff displays many of the pieces from the permanent collection alongside works by artists from around the world, demonstrating how Georgia's artistic community fits into a larger global context. The museum hosts rotating exhibitions throughout the year, and it encourages community engagement by regularly holding artist talks and other public programs.

75 Bennett St.
Atlanta,
GA
US

If you’re looking to pull the kids away from the television screen this weekend but can’t stand the thought of visiting the same dull museums, consider a stop into the Wren’s Nest House Museum. One of Atlanta’s oldest museums, the former home of Joel Chandler Harris educates tykes on the life of the author of the famous Brer Rabbit stories. Every Saturday afternoon, one of several local readers thrills children by re-enacting one of Harris’s popular tales. The walls of the small home are lined with mementos from the author’s life, and the rich, green brocade and period furniture give a welcoming atmosphere that your children will warm to quickly. You may find yourself enchanted by the stories as well, and you’re guaranteed to come away with a new appreciation for the classic stories of Joel Chandler Harris.

1050 Ralph David Abernathy Blvd SW
Atlanta,
GA
US

Conveniently located in the Selig Center, across the street from the Center for Puppetry Arts, the Breman Jewish Heritage & Holocaust Museum focuses on educating its visitors on Jewish history, and promoting universal themes like diversity and human dignity. The museum itself is tiny, but comes packed with interesting artifacts and tidbits about Jewish history in Atlanta and beyond. With such interesting pieces on display in the permanent collection, plus a continually flowing stream of exhibits, it’ll likely take several visits to really let the experience sink in. All the more reason to visit the gift shop, which stocks all manner of Jewish literature, holiday gifts and trinkets.

1440 Spring Street Northwest
Atlanta,
GA
US

As the leading art museums in the southeastern U.S., the High Museum of Art boasts a vast permanent collection of over 14,000 rotating pieces from cultures around the globe, housed within architecturally stunning buildings designed by Renzo Piano and Richard Meier. The Museum?s permanent collection includes nineteenth- and twentieth-century American art as well as European paintings and decorative pieces; a growing collection of African American art, and burgeoning collections of modern and contemporary art, photography, folk art, and African art. The High Museum is also dedicated to supporting and collecting works by southern artists.

1280 Peachtree St. NE
Atlanta,
GA
US

The Museum of Design Atlanta aims to "advance the understanding and appreciation of design", educating current and future design enthusiasts through subtle and brazen examples of design through rotating exhibits, conversational programs, events, and educational programs for kids. In the small boutique museum's airy rooms, exhibits showcase design across a wide spectrum of objects. Guest speakers regale MODA audiences once a month with discussions of their work, divulging where they get their inspiration, how they started in design, and current projects they're developing.

1315 Peachtree St NE
Atlanta,
GA
US

When the Center for Puppetry Arts opened its doors in 1978, Jim Henson and Kermit the Frog were on hand to cut the ribbon. Fittingly, one of its first major exhibitions, The Art of the Muppets in 1981, attracted more than 50,000 attendees. Since then, the center has matured into a multifaceted complex equal parts museum, performance center, and hub for working artists.

1404 Spring St NW
Atlanta,
GA
US