Clubs in Westside

Select Local Merchants

For the past two decades, Uptown Comedy Corner's small stage has hosted big acts such as Steve Harvey, Chris Rock, and Dave Chappelle, as well as weekly up-and-coming comedic talent. While watching performers' standup routines, guests can sip on cocktails and indulge in hearty American cuisine such as wings, half-pound hamburgers, and onion rings.

800 Marietta St NW
Atlanta,
GA
US

For more than a century, the cheery red brick and stark white pillars of The Tabernacle have looked out upon Atlanta. Originally the Broughton Tabernacle, the 1910 building served as a Baptist meeting place until the dispersal of its congregation in the mid-?80s. The building reopened as a music venue in 1996. Now, The Tabernacle treads the line between its history and current use, with the grandiose main hall?s stage still backed by the towering tubes of a pipe organ, and the light from its stained-glass windows filtering in on ornate chandeliers and professional speaker systems.

152 Luckie St. NW
Atlanta,
GA
US

MidCity Cafe sates hunger pangs and quenches thirsty throats with a menu stuffed with eclectic cuisine, soda and coffee drinks, and creative martinis. Un-pitted french olives adjudicate as slices of toasted pita bread swan dive into the Mediterranean-style hummus plate ($7.25), allowing chefs to focus their cooking goggles on artfully bundling pork, shrimp, and vegetables into crunch-laden fried spring rolls ($4.94). For heartier fare, hands can happily wrap around MidCity’s banh mi ($5.95–$8.95), a Saigon-style sandwich built on a foundation of crispy baguette and layered with pickled daikon, fresh jalapeño, and a choice of meaty or meat-free protein. Fuel liquid lust with a selection from 15 inventive Grey Goose martinis ($9 each), such as the French Toast martini, which whips up a Bond-style breakfast of Amarula fruit cream liqueur, Frangelico, and a dash of self-destructing cinnamon.

845 Spring St NW
Atlanta,
GA
US

What do you get when you cross local, farm-to-table ingredients with a southern-cooking mentality? It’s a question that Briza attempts to answer with food that stands out for its dedication to quality—yet doesn’t skimp on the playfulness. When making the menu, Executive Chef Janine Falvo was inspired by her family’s robust culinary traditions and by the chefs she worked under as she made her name in the business. From them she contracted a passion for working with only fresh and local ingredients whose flavors pop on their own merits.. Her cornmeal fried green tomatoes up the ante on the Southern staple, with a breading that melds with the acidity of its pickled shrimp accompaniment. Halibut comes on a bed of lobster homefries, in which each chunk of crustacean and each tiny, crisp potato cube contributes flavor or texture. Then there’s the organic smoked and fried chicken, which adds a new layer to a well-loved dish. Certainly it’s that creativity that played a part in previously awarding Falvo with Restaurant Hospitality's Rising Star Chef accolade. Looking around the modern-meets-baroque dining room, it’s evident that a mix of textures is just as important in the scenery as it is in the food. Velvety couches flank stainless steel cocktail tables in the bar area and the dining room cozies studded armchairs up to heavy wood tables. Everything looks touchable, yet museum-worthy—a conundrum that thankfully doesn’t apply to the pretty and magnetic food.

866 W Peachtree St NW
Atlanta,
GA
US

Situated just steps from the historic Fox Theatre, Churchill Grounds tantalizes patrons with nightly live-jazz sessions and a menu of eclectic entrees and thirst-quenchers. During a scotch tasting, diners can sip, slurp, and dab their inner wrists with a quintet of mini whiskeys poured by laser-shrunken Scotsmen. Churchill Grounds' proprietor highlights different scotches frequently, though a flight might include Glenlivet 12, Glenmorangie 10, or Cragganmore. For patrons seeking more solid fuel, chefs slow-roast boneless beef ribs before dousing them in soy-garlic sauce ($18.95), and wild mushroom ravioli with a light garlic cream sauce ($10.95) fills empty stomachs. The hummus dip arrives with warm pita wedges ($7.95), stir-fried calamari rings ($14.95) inspire fork-diving into a pool of spicy red-pepper sauce, and spinach-artichoke dip begins meals with light fare ($7.95). Cure parched pouts with red or white wine ($5.50–$9/glass) complemented by artisanal cheese plates (market price), or a selection of beers from around the world, including Pilsner Urquell ($4.50) and La Fin du Monde ($6.25).

660 Peachtree St NE
Atlanta,
GA
US

Flush with cash during the Roaring Twenties, Atlanta's Shriners set out to build a magnificent monument for their headquarters, dubbed the Yaarab Temple Shrine Mosque. The structure was to feature grandiose architectural touches such as towering minarets and onion domes. When a teetering economy threatened construction, the Shriners sold the building to film mogul William Fox, who finished the space as a movie palace with virtually no changes to its extravagant design. As splendid as the exterior was, audiences were unprepared for the interior. After seeing it for the first time, one Atlanta Journal reporter breathlessly remarked on the "picturesque and almost disturbing grandeur" on display.

Crafted to resemble the courtyard of a Moorish castle, the main hall's decorations begin in the back with a faux canopy of plaster and steel stretching over the rear balcony. Stone parapets wrap around the sides, culminating in a towering proscenium arch illuminated by hanging lanterns and overhung with persian rugs. Above, a blue ceiling sparkles with hundreds of recessed light bulbs, which refract through three-inch crystals. Projected clouds drift across this simulated starry night and rain on anyone who texts during a show.

The final jewel in the theater's gilded crown is the The Mighty Mo Organ. The second-largest theater organ in the world, the Mighty Mo was custom-built in 1929 for the princely sum of $42,000 to accompany any movie or live production. The instrument’s richly textured sounds erupt from 3,622 pipes of varying length, with the smallest no larger than a pen and the largest spanning five feet in diameter. Adding to the Mighty Mo's sonic tapestry is an internal glockenspiel, marimba, and xylophone, plus a system by which the stage's grand piano can be played remotely. The Mighty Mo also mimics thunder, steamboat whistles, saxophones, and its parents' voices when they're not around.

660 Peachtree Street Northeast
Atlanta,
GA
US