Festivals in Westside

Select Local Merchants

Blue Mark Studios thrives inside the refurbished halls of century-old St. James Church by regularly hosting exhibitions of newly discovered artists from around the U.S. In addition to traditional art exhibitions, Blue Mark's resident artists load the studio's calendar of events with countless openings, fashion shows, dance parties, and art lessons. They craft their works in private studios on the premises, ranging from ceramics to visual FX and 3D media. They often sell their pieces to people wishing to display art in their home or on their bumper.

892 Jefferson Street Northwest
Atlanta,
GA
US

Despite its name, Atlanta Taste of the Trucks does not serve up plates of tasty truck parts. The trucks in question are actually gourmet food trucks, and they're loaded with Italian ices, hot dogs, tacos, and other treats crafted with local ingredients. Live music fills the air throughout the event, and family-friendly activities are available to keep kids from trying to ride a food truck like a pony.

930 Spring Street Northwest
Atlanta,
GA
US

The Great Urban Race is a one-day event pitting teams of two against one another in a race combining physical challenges, scavenger hunts, and puzzles. Up to 700 twosomes will traverse 4 to 8 miles of Toronto terrain on foot and by public transportation as they solve 12 challenging clues in a fun quest to reach the finish line first. Sample clues and challenges from past Great Urban Races include charades, bubble-gum chewing, pig Latin deciphering, bicycle races, and word scrambles, making this race ideal for competitive eaters and cryptographers alike. Teams are encouraged to dress up in matching outfits, and prizes will be awarded for best costume. Prizes are also given for race results, with $300 going to first place, $200 to second place, and $100 to third place. The top 25 teams will qualify for the National Championship in New Orleans in November, with the top three teams receiving free entry. Each participant gets a T-shirt and postrace refreshments of fruit, granola bars, and a run through a Perrier sprinkler. Read over the rules and FAQs for more information.

79 Poplar Street Northwest
Atlanta,
GA
US

Since banding together in 1979, the historians at Atlanta Preservation Center have helped ward off packs of angry bulldozers from more than 175 endangered buildings. Working alongside local government, businesses, and community leaders, the preservation team has saved elaborate structures including the Peters House and Winecoff Hotel. In addition, its headquarters—the 1856 Grant Mansion in Grant Park—is one of just three antebellum houses left in Atlanta and the team is currently working to restore the building to its architecturally accurate origins. When it isn’t keeping delicate treasures from crumbling, the Atlanta Preservation Center leads walking tours of historic areas and tells embarrassing stories from the days when the city’s buildings were just a bunch of baby bricks.

660 Peachtree Street Northeast
Atlanta,
GA
US

Flush with cash during the Roaring Twenties, Atlanta's Shriners set out to build a magnificent monument for their headquarters, dubbed the Yaarab Temple Shrine Mosque. The structure was to feature grandiose architectural touches such as towering minarets and onion domes. When a teetering economy threatened construction, the Shriners sold the building to film mogul William Fox, who finished the space as a movie palace with virtually no changes to its extravagant design. As splendid as the exterior was, audiences were unprepared for the interior. After seeing it for the first time, one Atlanta Journal reporter breathlessly remarked on the "picturesque and almost disturbing grandeur" on display.

Crafted to resemble the courtyard of a Moorish castle, the main hall's decorations begin in the back with a faux canopy of plaster and steel stretching over the rear balcony. Stone parapets wrap around the sides, culminating in a towering proscenium arch illuminated by hanging lanterns and overhung with persian rugs. Above, a blue ceiling sparkles with hundreds of recessed light bulbs, which refract through three-inch crystals. Projected clouds drift across this simulated starry night and rain on anyone who texts during a show.

The final jewel in the theater's gilded crown is the The Mighty Mo Organ. The second-largest theater organ in the world, the Mighty Mo was custom-built in 1929 for the princely sum of $42,000 to accompany any movie or live production. The instrument’s richly textured sounds erupt from 3,622 pipes of varying length, with the smallest no larger than a pen and the largest spanning five feet in diameter. Adding to the Mighty Mo's sonic tapestry is an internal glockenspiel, marimba, and xylophone, plus a system by which the stage's grand piano can be played remotely. The Mighty Mo also mimics thunder, steamboat whistles, saxophones, and its parents' voices when they're not around.

660 Peachtree St NE
Atlanta,
GA
US

In a single day, Peachtree Music Festival saturates the senses with two stages showcasing 18 bands on festival grounds that corral food trucks, a beer garden, fashion vendors, and artists into eight buzzing acres. A star-studded, eclectic lineup drops names like a clumsy plaque polisher, boasting such acts as Shiny Toy Guns, a Grammy-nominated electronic band, and local sensation DGAF: Dallas Austin and Corey Enemy. DJ Khaled bounces beats from his new album, which features collaborations with stars such as Kayne West, Jay-Z, Akon, and available members from the constellation Cassiopeia.

48 8th Street Northeast
Atlanta,
GA
US