Cafes in Crestview

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Cake balls combine the airy, familiar texture of cake with the appearance of a large truffle, just like a PBR can stuffed inside a pheasant. The lineup of deadly good delectables includes red velvet with sweet-cream buttermilk and Valrhona cocoa, an Italian crème shaggy with coconut and diced pecans, and Montmorency cherry almond. The availability of some flavors may vary based on demand.

7950 Anderson Sq
Austin,
TX
US

Wild About Harry's is a checker-floored diner that happily dishes out a host of hearty hot dogs and a daily flavor rotation of fresh, frozen custard. Kick back with a red-hot Southwest Firedog ($5.49) or satiate sauerkraut cravings with a New York dog ($4.49). Douse your blazing tongue in an icy mouthful of frozen custard whipped into a shake, such as the Hershey-infused Captain America ($4.99), or a sumptuous sundae, such as the banana split ($5.99). Creative frozen custard enthusiasts can festoon their frozen concoction with an assortment of toppings, including coconut shavings and sliced almonds ($0.80 each), and then dig in with a firmly gripped spoon and a loose understanding of where the dream world and real world separate.

2525 W Anderson Ln
Austin,
TX
US

Kenneth Threadgill stood in line all night to be the first person in Travis County to get a beer license. It was 1933, and the bootlegger and country-music connoisseur had plans to evolve his filling station into something bigger—though even Threadgill probably couldn't have anticipated how big it would become.

It started with touring musicians stopping in for drinks after their shows. By the ’60s, Janis Joplin was on stage, polishing her unpolished sound for crowds from all walks of life. The evolution continued, with Threadgill's hosting artists from Jerry Lee Lewis to Captain Beefheart and expanding into a Southern-style restaurant where the love of music ironed out disagreements and engendered an atmosphere of tolerance.

Today, the original location on North Lamar harks back to Threadgill's beginnings, with current owner Eddie Wilson decking the place out with decor that evokes the Austin of the 1930s to the 1960s, including vintage signs that say, “I can’t wait for the internet to be invented.” The second location on West Riverside celebrates the 1970s music scene that thrived at the Armadillo—Wilson's former establishment at that location. At both venues, chefs churn out classic Southern food, such as chicken-fried steak and fried green tomatoes, while frequent live music entertains guests.

6416 N Lamar Blvd
Austin,
TX
US

Waterloo Ice House was named best restaurant in the Austin Chronicle Best of Austin 2010 Readers Poll. Yelpers give the Escarpment Boulevard, 38th Street, Southpark Meadows, Bull Creek, and Burnett Road locations an average of three stars.

8600 Burnet Rd
Austin,
TX
US

Since 1964, Blimpie has filled patrons' bellies with submarines packed with freshly sliced meats and quality toppings. Each of the coast-to-coast franchise's locations offers an assortment of bread-based eats ranging from classic deli subs to paninis served between warm ciabatta buns festooned with grill stripes or uneven tan lines. Subsmiths roll up fresh wraps and keep waistlines in check with Lighter Stuff, a health-conscious selection of menu items with less than 400 calories and 6 grams of fat. Kids' meals satiate the appetites of youngsters 12 years old and younger or adults with fake IDs.

3301 Steck Ave
Austin,
TX
US

When discussing the motive behind opening an old-school arcade, Darren Spohn told reporters from the Austin American-Statesman, "People have lost that social experience—they sit on couches with [their] Xbox, they never talk to their kids. You want to come to a place where you can play together with your kids, too, and find something that the whole family enjoys. I wanted to recreate that experience in an arcade again.” The arcade enthusiast had been collecting pinball machines all his life before opening Pinballz Arcade, hoping to reintroduce the magic of the classic arcade to a community that's gravitated toward impersonal gaming consoles and lonely one-man games of ping-pong.

Today, Darren's arcade has blossomed into a 13,000-square-foot space with more than 200 classic and modern games. The pride of the arcade is its collection of more than 100 pinball machines—colorful blinking, clattering, and beeping apparatuses dating as far back as 1966. The facility is home to time-honored video games such as Pac-Man and Donkey Kong, as well as cutting-edge shooting and dancing games. Some games—such as skeeball and Hungry Hungry Hippos—earn players tickets that can be redeemed for knickknacks and electronics.

After a round of Tron or Mortal Kombat, guests can gather at the onsite BYOB café to compare scores over burgers and pizza. All of the video games at the arcade are for sale, so customers can purchase pinball machines of their own to play in their home, office, or voting precinct.

8940 Research Blvd, Ste 100
Austin,
TX
US