Vegetarian Restaurants in North University

Select Local Merchants

Health-conscious Austinites have a lot of delicious dining options to choose from, but Veggie Heaven remains a go-to choice for fresh, delicious vegetarian cuisine. Veggie Heaven's food is a healthy-leaning take on the typical University of Texas campus-area Chinese delivery spots. The restaurant's diverse offerings are 100% vegetarian, but come loaded with familiar flavors that might surprise meat-eaters as well. The small white storefront is short on charm and décor, but does a brisk takeout and delivery business along the Drag, including their signature lychee juice bubble drink, as well as assorted hot entrée, steamed buns and several vegan offerings. The politically-minded owners also share their views on various world issues openly, hanging banners and leaving literature out for customers to peruse while they wait for their meat-free meals to arrive.

1914 Guadalupe St
Austin,
TX
US

Carrying a pita, a diner approaches a toppings bar brimming with pickled condiments, crunchy vegetables, and sauces. Without paying or even speaking to someone behind the counter, the diner lifts the spoon and festoons the pita with a pile of fresh toppings, ready to start the meal anew. At most restaurants, this could get you kicked out, but at Maoz, it’s not only overlooked, but also encouraged. After choosing from such vegetarian and vegan-friendly options as gluten-free falafel and fried eggplant, pita wraps or salads head to the single-visit salad bar. Belgian fries—a thick-cut, lightly battered version of their french cousins—and mounds of sweet-potato fries complement sandwiches and salads along with green-chili sauce, mayo, and salsa for dipping and boosting the self-esteem of napkins.

While feasting, diners sit atop benches at long, shared tables that emulate the communal lunch joints of old in the unabashedly modern chain of restaurants, founded in Amsterdam two decades ago. Mirroring the eatery’s fresh, stylish food, the interior at Maoz features green tiled walls and steel fixtures illuminated by hanging lamps and baby pictures of supernovas.

4601 N Lamar Blvd
Austin,
TX
US

In Italy, a "sagra" is a festival where a community comes together in celebration of a local ingredient or dish—a tradition that fits Gabriel Pellegrini's enoteca and trattoria in both spirit and practice. Classic, bistro-style Italian cuisine joins local, Texan ingredients and flavors to create an entire menu worthy of commemoration. But that isn't to say all the ingredients are local. Imported Mediterranean cheeses and cured meats join house-made mozzarella atop hand-stretched neapolitan pizzas before bubbling gold in a wood-burning stove.

Such dedication to craft and quality carries over into the bar. Shelves brim with liqueurs, grappas, and wines imported from Italy, but the bartenders grow their own herbs, make their own bitters, and infuse syrups and spirits in-house for cocktails that are inimitable in freshness and flavor.

Located in the heart of Austin, the building's custard-yellow and sunset-orange walls complement the warm earth tones of well-trodden floorboards. Black banquettes and chairs surround white linen-draped tables. During the day, natural light streams in through the windows, but at night the soft glow of flickering wall sconces and pendant lamps suffuses the dining area—a suitable atmosphere for a romantic evening or shadow-puppet reenactment of the Battle of Philippi.

1610 San Antonio St
Austin,
TX
US

El Chato means "the plain one", but there is absolutely nothing simple about the restaurant El Chato. The eatery is house in a 1958 Greyhound bus that has been converted into a bustaurant. Colorful Mexican murals grace the exterior of the vehicle, while inside a compact stainless steel kitchen cooks up platters of authentic interior Mexican cuisine. And El Chato's chefs are certain to let patrons know that these particular interior Mexican entrees are nothing like their Americanized counterparts oozing with Velveeta cheese and ground meat. The chefs instead boil and shred the meat they pack into their tacos, empanadas, and tamales; use only white cheese including asadero; and handcraft enchiladas by dipping them in chili sauce before frying them in oil.

The restaurant's hefty entrees are served up for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, and can be enjoyed amid the interior's cozy booths or on the outdoor patio illuminated by string lights and the moon, which they lasso in each night. Designed to be family-friendly, they also feature an outdoor playground set for children.

1617 East 7th Street Austin Tx
Austin,
TX
US

Skewers loaded with grass-fed beef and free-range chicken sizzle on the grill at Wholly Kabob, serving as tasty examples of the locally sourced ingredients that fill pita wraps and kebab bowls. Garnished with middle eastern condiments such as hummus, pickles, and mint lemon juice, these dishes sate appetites at lunch, dinner, and late night on the weekends. Additionally, Wholly Kabob hosts free weddings and vow renewals from time to time, uniting and reuniting couples who belong together like peanut butter and jellyfish.

95 Rainey Street
Austin,
TX
US

Kenneth Threadgill stood in line all night to be the first person in Travis County to get a beer license. It was 1933, and the bootlegger and country-music connoisseur had plans to evolve his filling station into something bigger?though even Threadgill probably couldn't have anticipated how big it would become.

It started with touring musicians stopping in for drinks after their shows. By the ?60s, Janis Joplin was on stage, polishing her unpolished sound for crowds from all walks of life. The evolution continued, with Threadgill's hosting artists from Jerry Lee Lewis to Captain Beefheart and expanding into a Southern-style restaurant where the love of music ironed out disagreements and engendered an atmosphere of tolerance.

Today, the original location on North Lamar harks back to Threadgill's beginnings, with current owner Eddie Wilson decking the place out with decor that evokes the Austin of the 1930s to the 1960s, including vintage signs that say, ?I can?t wait for the internet to be invented.? The second location on West Riverside celebrates the 1970s music scene that thrived at the Armadillo?Wilson's former establishment at that location. At both venues, chefs churn out classic Southern food, such as chicken-fried steak and fried green tomatoes, while frequent live music entertains guests.

6416 N Lamar Blvd
Austin,
TX
US