Museums in Bolton Hill


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Street artists use walls as canvases, but probably only a few are given the opportunity to use an entire building. The aptly named Graffiti Warehouse, managed by the Rosenfeld Organization, is a massive industrial studio where street artists have access to a safe space and extra-large, 34-foot canvases to do their work. Though each artist is required to bring his or her own paint, completed pieces go up on display and can be sold on-site, with half the proceeds going back to the creator. More than a dozen established artists currently call this space an exhibition home for their paintings and other media. Open Walls photography tours provide glimpses of select street artists' work and introduce guests to the streets of Baltimore by visiting nearby under-used urban spaces, sites of beautiful murals, and the one overpass where Picasso used to hang out. Street artists aren't the only clients served by the studio, though: Graffiti Warehouse also supplies art therapists and photographers with resources and studios that feature soaring nine-foot windows and private bathrooms.
128 West North Avenue
Baltimore,
MD
US
With an arsenal of informative magazines, elegant photographs, and illuminating documentaries, National Geographic has inspired planetary responsibility and natural wonderment for more than 120 years. Their latest filmed adventure, The Last Lions, ushers viewers into the wetlands of Botswana's Okavango Delta, where a lioness named Ma di Tau and her cubs fight for their survival. From fleeing raging fires and cub-killing rival prides to wading through crocodile-infested rivers and the supermarket at rush hour, this family suffers perils that leave audiences touched and awestruck. Crafted by award-winning filmmakers, Dereck and Beverly Joubert, and narrated by Jeremy Irons, The Last Lions aims to raise awareness of dwindling big-cat populations while sharing a compelling story of hope. The film is rated PG for depictions of the food-chain cycle without the accompaniment of an Elton John song.
1711 North Charles Street
Baltimore,
MD
US
Since 1844, Maryland Historical Society has kept residents connected to their state's heritage by publishing educational books and a quarterly magazine. These days, its museum brings that archived history to life with more than 350,000 objects, most notably the oldest-known surviving manuscript of Francis Scott Key's "The Star-Spangled Banner," which includes its original, crossed out title, "Get Ready for Baseball, America." Guests can also marvel at artifacts ranging from 900 pieces of furniture made between 1634 and 2000 to more than 2,000 paintings, including seven by Joshua Johnson, America's first professional African American portrait painter. Meanwhile, its Civil War exhibit occupies more than 5,000 square feet with 3-D video presentations. The society also sponsors extensive educational programs that enlighten young students with field trips, plus adult programs that include lectures, concerts, and symposia.
201 W Monument St
Baltimore,
MD
US
Climb the Washington Monument's 228 steps and you'll find some impressive views of the city. But that's not all that makes this monument worth a visit. The first architectural monument dedicated to George Washington, it houses a museum at its base, and is the site of open-air festivals and events year-round.
699 Washington Pl
Baltimore,
MD
US
More than 25,000 pieces of art fill the Walters Art Museum's permanent collection. Among these are works that date back to ancient Rome—including six sarcophagi—and paintings from the Impressionist movement, including Monet’s Springtime. Museum-goers can also peruse rare books, art from Ethiopia, and Japanese military armor.
600 N Charles St
Baltimore,
MD
US
1840 became a landmark year for teeth when the world's first college of dentistry opened in Baltimore. In 1904, the school moved to a new building on campus at the University of Maryland, Baltimore, and in 1996, that historic structure became the country's official monument to the dental profession, the National Museum of Dentistry. Size: about 7,000 square feet?small enough to explore in an afternoon and large enough to fit at least 17 dinosaur molars Eye Catcher: the massive set of chompers that helps kids practice their brush technique Permanent Mainstay: the dental accoutrements of historic figures, such as Queen Victoria's personal instruments and George Washington's decidedly non-wooden ivory dentures Don't Miss: a tour through the history of toothbrushes that takes visitors back thousands of years via real artifacts
31 South Greene Street
Baltimore,
MD
US
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