Galleries in Inner Harbor


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The American Visionary Art Museum devotes its space to original work by self-taught artists who honed their craft—often unintentionally—while operating on the outskirts of the formal art world. As temporary exhibitions explore a particular artist or theme in depth, the permanent collection displays thousands of powerful and often whimsical items, such as Andrew Logan's mirror-winged Black Icarus, or the haunting Applewood Figure, an emaciated sculpture said to wince whenever someone eats a piece of fruit. The museum spreads its arresting pieces throughout three historical buildings, including the expansive main building, which boasts a reflective mirrored-mosaic exterior and neighbors the Tall Sculpture Barn, an ex-whiskey warehouse fully equipped with 45-foot ceilings for large-scale projects. A wildflower garden—complete with meditation chapel—and a sculpture plaza featuring a 55-foot whirligig beckon visitors to the museum's outdoor space, where envious clouds shape themselves into crude versions of Pietà. Completing any trip, the museum's Sideshow gift shop stuffs shopping bags with an ever-rotating collection of eclectic artwork, jewelry, toys, and more.
800 Key Highway
Baltimore,
MD
US
Created by Steve Geppi, the founder of Diamond Comic Distributors, Geppi's Entertainment Museum traces the evolution of American popular culture from the late 1700s to today with nearly 6,000 artifacts such as comics, dolls, and games. Along with rotating special exhibitions, the museum's permanent galleries each dedicate themselves to a specific period or medium. Rekindle your flame with favorite cultural characters such as Batman, Mickey Mouse, and Barbie as you place them in historical context via the museum's massive memorabilia-based timeline.
301 W Camden St
Baltimore,
MD
US
Baltimore Comedy Factory has nonviolently busted guts with nationally sourced joke-slingers for nearly three decades. Several nights a week, the club schedules sets by stars pulled onto the stage fresh from appearances in blockbuster comedies and hit TV shows. After years in the Power Plant Live! complex, the Factory has moved its mirth into the former digs of Toby's Dinner Theater at the Best Western Plus Hotel, where longtime patrons now enjoy quality comedy without having to endure dinner theater.
8 Market Pl
Baltimore,
MD
US
Looming 15 stories above the surrounding streets, the Bromo Seltzer Arts Tower has been a landmark in Baltimore ever since it was constructed in 1911. Upon completion, this structure?inspired by the design of the Palazzo Vecchio in Florence, Italy?was the tallest building in the city and served as a symbol of Baltimore's advancement to its creator, the inventor of the titular headache remedy. The Baltimore Office of Promotion & the Arts decided to preserve this proudly progressive legacy by adapting the layout to create studio spaces for more than 30 visual and literary artists hoping to continue their work within a modernized setting. Guests can visit the historical clock tower on Fridays and Saturdays, as well as during lightning storms that will send plucky characters back to 1985. Tours enter the structure's clock room, whose faces feature the words "Bromo-Seltzer" instead of numerals, for peeks at the inner workings and vistas that include Camden Yards. During open-studio hours, visitors also have the opportunity to see the artists' workspaces and view nascent pieces in a variety of media, such as oil painting, photography, sculpture, digital art, and charcoal.
21 South Eutaw Street
Baltimore,
MD
US
Established: 2005 Handicap Accessible: Yes Staff Size: 25?50 Parking: Parking garage Reservations/Appointments: Optional Most popular offering: African-American art, history, culture Pro Tip: $6 validated parking is directly across the street at the PMI Parking Garage. Good for Kids: Yes Walk-ins Welcome: Yes The Reginald F. Lewis Museum celebrates the achievements of African Americans, especially those from Maryland?which often means expanding on grade-school history lessons. For instance, Betsy Ross is typically credited with making the first American flag. However, one of the museum's rotating exhibits reveals that Grace Wisher, an African American indentured servant, also worked on the original star spangled banner. Dubbed "For Whom It Stands: The Flag and the American People," that exhibit was recognized as one of the country's best in the summer of 2014 by USA Today?in part because it featured a scrap of the real, first flag, covered in the bald eagle feathers that filled the air back then. That's just one of the myriad rotating exhibits that the museum has hosted, to complement permanent collections that highlight Maryland African Americans' endurance through two centuries of slavery, and their artistic and intellectual innovations. Q&A with Helen Yuen, Director Of Marketing What sets your business apart from your competition? A Smithsonian affiliate, the museum is the east coast?s largest African-American museum. Besides rotating exhibitions, enjoy live musical performances from gospel jazz to steel drums. Films in our theater have enriched audiences on the history of soul food, civil rights, and more. For families, programs like art workshops and living history bring our mission to life. Lectures and our resource center enrich what you'll find in our permanent collection. We also nourish the body with the best soul food in Baltimore at our museum cafe. Visit our website for a full calendar of events. What was the inspiration for starting this business? To showcase the rich contributions of Maryland African Americans, from Harriet Tubman and Thurgood Marshall to the unsung heroes who helped make Maryland what it is today. What?s your favorite part about your job? Having people experience something new, different, and enriching to their lives.
830 E Pratt St.
Baltimore,
MD
US
1840 became a landmark year for teeth when the world's first college of dentistry opened in Baltimore. In 1904, the school moved to a new building on campus at the University of Maryland, Baltimore, and in 1996, that historic structure became the country's official monument to the dental profession, the National Museum of Dentistry. Size: about 7,000 square feet?small enough to explore in an afternoon and large enough to fit at least 17 dinosaur molars Eye Catcher: the massive set of chompers that helps kids practice their brush technique Permanent Mainstay: the dental accoutrements of historic figures, such as Queen Victoria's personal instruments and George Washington's decidedly non-wooden ivory dentures Don't Miss: a tour through the history of toothbrushes that takes visitors back thousands of years via real artifacts
31 South Greene Street
Baltimore,
MD
US
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