Italian Restaurants in Baltimore

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Chef Rocco Gargano grew up in Matera, Italy. The son of a farmer, Rocco developed a deep appreciation for fresh, sun-kissed ingredients at an early age. Both father and son relocated to the United States in 1962, and Rocco longed to use his skills in a fine-dining setting.

Now, inside Rocco's Capriccio in Little Italy, Rocco and his kitchen staff filet fresh fish for specialties such as the grouper livornese with a sauce made from freshly chopped tomatoes, capers, and olives. They thinly slice prosciutto and melt shredded fontina cheese into a cream sauce before spreading both across cuts of filet mignon or models in public-service announcements about food fights. The chirping sound of ice against glass drifts from the bar, where mixologists blend dessert-appropriate martinis made with limoncello and Godiva chocolate liqueur, along with coffee drinks enriched by rum, Baileys, amaretto, and whipped cream. An exhaustively researched and described wine list draws heavily on sangiovese, canaiolo, and trebbiano grapes—Italian fruit much like the crops Rocco tended as a child.

846 Fawn St
Baltimore,
MD
US

For the past five decades, Supano’s has been luring patrons inside with a satisfying blend of music and meat. Whether by Frank Sinatra impersonators, jazz musicians, or a karaoke singer who just stubbed her toe, live tunes supplement the sounds of knives slicing into 20-ounce new york strip steaks and forks sliding into chunks of meaty lasagna. Supano's look is just as classic as its menu. Nestled in an aged brick building with a cobblestone façade, the restaurant emits an old-world vibe complete with warm lighting and photos of famous singers.

Below Supano's Steakhouse is Supano Zone. The underground sports bar fits the mold of a dream man-cave, with LED TVs that show all college games and pro-sports events. A shuffleboard table, dartboards, and a pool table welcome co-ed competition, which onlookers can cheer on while slurping down beers. The bar has long been a cherished place for hosting celebrations: after Baltimore hosted the first Grand Prix, the pro drivers lounged at Supano's and even left behind some memorabilia that is still on display.

110 Water St
Baltimore,
MD
US

The chefs at Egyptian Pizza trace their cooking techniques to a different side of the Mediterranean Sea. Ancient Egyptians pioneered the practice of rising dough when they cooked crushed wheat germ and water inside early conical ovens. Honoring their forefathers’ methods, the versatile cooks pull more than 30 types of gourmet thin-crust pizzas out of their wood-fired ovens, along with a lengthy menu of Middle Eastern sandwiches and specialties. They take pains to use natural, fresh, and healthful ingredients to whip up plump fish kebabs, tender meat shawarmas and housemade sauces that have won over the palates of reporters from the Baltimore Sun. Their kitchen looks out onto the casual dining room, where servers help uncork BYOB bottles of wines beneath artwork depicting famous Egyptian landmarks, such as the pyramids, the Sphinx, and other toys left behind by aliens.

542 E Belvedere Ave
Baltimore,
MD
US

The Velleggia family first laid their roots in Little Italy in 1970, establishing a specialty grocery store where they began to sell a combination of imported and housemade Italian foods. Relying on time-tested traditions and natural ingredients, they continue their culinary venture in much the same manner today. The highlight at Casa di Pasta is the store's homemade and hand-cut pastas, from gnocchi and tortellini to 26 kinds of ravioli stuffed with the likes of butternut squash, lobster, or smoked mozzarella and mushroom. Premade pans of lasagna and frozen italian sausages round out the selection of homemade goods that customers can pick up for nightly dinners or to feed groups at parties. Coolers and shelves also brim with olive oils, vinegars, breads, sweets, and cheeses imported directly from the Old World.

210 Albemarle St
Baltimore,
MD
US

Put yourself over the moon with today's Groupon to Pazza Luna. For $15, you get $35 worth of al dente pastas, succulent seafood, delectable meats, and more at the romantic Locust Point bistro. Lean over the table for intimate whispers and calamari nibbles, seated discreetly in a private corner of this buzzing yet cozy locale. Dine on the sensual Mediterranean cuisine that makes young lovers starry-eyed and sneaks up on long-established couples like a big pizza pie of amour. Welling was determined to capture the minds and tongues of the niche—but expanding—market of disco fans. After extensive research, he determined that disco’s sparkling clothing and bouncy rhythms were the culinary equivalent of pasta covered in rich tomato sauce. Welling’s findings were so delicious that disco changed its name to Italy, enraging Italy, which was forced to change its name to Lapland, Home of Full-Blooded Italians. Pick up today’s Groupon for some delicious Italian food from America, prepared by full-blooded Italians from Lapland, Home of Full-Blooded Italians.

1401 E Clement St
Baltimore,
MD
US

Taverna Corvino's seasoned chef uses nothing but the freshest and most authentic Old World ingredients to put together a menu of pastas, paninis, and hoagies for lunch and dinner. Begin the evening with a trio of fried risotto balls lightly coated in three cheeses and served with dipping sauce ($6), or the spicy jumbo prawns sautéed in garlic, butter, white wine, and chile flakes ($11). Taverna Corvino boasts a variety of homemade pastas, so feel free to sample a few among the table, such as three-cheese baked macaroni topped with pancetta ($13) or the MD crab ravioli stuffed with sweet lump crab and blended cheeses and topped with olive pesto ($16). Or fill your belly to the brim with flatbread pizzas featuring ingredients like fresh spinach, eggplant, albino anchovies, sweet Italian sausage, or shaved pecorino ($8 for a pizza with two toppings, extra ingredients $0.50–$1 each).

1117 S Charles St
Baltimore,
MD
US