Jazz Clubs in Baltimore

Select Local Merchants

For the past five decades, Supano’s has been luring patrons inside with a satisfying blend of music and meat. Whether by Frank Sinatra impersonators, jazz musicians, or a karaoke singer who just stubbed her toe, live tunes supplement the sounds of knives slicing into 20-ounce new york strip steaks and forks sliding into chunks of meaty lasagna. Supano's look is just as classic as its menu. Nestled in an aged brick building with a cobblestone façade, the restaurant emits an old-world vibe complete with warm lighting and photos of famous singers.

Below Supano's Steakhouse is Supano Zone. The underground sports bar fits the mold of a dream man-cave, with LED TVs that show all college games and pro-sports events. A shuffleboard table, dartboards, and a pool table welcome co-ed competition, which onlookers can cheer on while slurping down beers. The bar has long been a cherished place for hosting celebrations: after Baltimore hosted the first Grand Prix, the pro drivers lounged at Supano's and even left behind some memorabilia that is still on display.

110 Water St
Baltimore,
MD
US

For more than 23 years, Twins Jazz Club has been at the forefront of Washington, D.C.'s jazz music scene, showcasing local and national traditional jazz acts seven nights a week. On any given night, you can experience acts ranging from music students participating in jam sessions to major jazz artists (even Stevie Wonder stopped by in 2007 to check out Twins).

1344 U St NW
Washington,
DC
US

Five nights a week, the air inside Jo Jo Restaurant and Bar reverberates with live jazz and blues music that filters through a dining room populated by succulent, contemporary American entrees. The Angus-beef drunken skirt steak arrives smothered in the chef's special bourbon glaze and grilled to tongue-pleasing perfection, and the pan-seared jumbo-lump crab cake doubles up on a duo of sauces—roasted-red-pepper beurre blanc and creamy mushroom. Cajun shrimps, wrapped and skewered with strips of bacon, come strewn across a bed of rice pilaf and enrobed in creole mustard sauce. Between bites, diners can tipple a bottle of house wine as nearby musicians tickle the strings of their instruments to soothe souls like a hot-stone massage from a sentient Japanese rock garden.

1518 U St NW
Washington,
DC
US

Press across North America, including the New York Times, the National Post, and the Phoenix New Times, reviewed or featured A Jew Grows in Brooklyn. Yelpers give Strathmore an average of 4.5 stars:

5301 Tuckerman Lane
Rockville,
MD
US

Perched atop the Arts & Innovation Center in Rockville, Maryland, Rockville Rooftop Live looks out over the city center and town square. While taking in these the scenic views, guests lend their ears to a packed schedule of live performers, including weekly DJ sets, shows by local favorites, and experimental, musicless shows during closing hours. Tasty grub and cold drinks keep showgoers happy during musical repasts.

155 Gibbs Street
Rockville,
MD
US

With so many monuments, museums and tourists, it’s surprising that anything is hidden in Washington DC. But Blues Alley is exactly that – tucked away down a cobblestone alleyway and into an 18th-century red brick carriage house. This hidden-but-well-traveled jazz and dinner venue is nearly half a century old, with the ongoing vibe of a 1920s jazz club. The intimate stage has hosted greats ranging from Dizzy Gillespie and Sarah Vaughan to Chick Corea, Tuck & Patti, John Pizzarelli and Eva Cassidy. The amazing sound system, an appreciative audience made up of in-the-know locals and music cognoscenti, the relaxed vibe and easy accessibility to the performers – who sometimes make the rounds between sets – make this the perfect jazz joint. Dinner is served in the form of Creole cuisine with steak and seafood touches, but the food is entirely secondary to the show.

1073 Wisconsin Ave NW
Washington,
DC
US