Galleries in Lexington


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  • Edgar Allan Poe House and Museum
    Not two miles northwest of the Inner Harbor sits the small brick home where Edgar Allan Poe lived from 1833–35. Since those days, the residence has gone almost entirely unchanged: the wooden floors, plaster walls, narrow winding steps, and even the original fabrics all remain. Walk through the (bare) rooms where the author began to transition from poetry to short stories and search for the inspiration of such works as "The Visionary."
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    203 North Amity Street
    Baltimore, MD US
  • National Museum of Dentistry
    1840 became a landmark year for teeth when the world's first college of dentistry opened in Baltimore. In 1904, the school moved to a new building on campus at the University of Maryland, Baltimore, and in 1996, that historic structure became the country's official monument to the dental profession, the National Museum of Dentistry. Size: about 7,000 square feet?small enough to explore in an afternoon and large enough to fit at least 17 dinosaur molars Eye Catcher: the massive set of chompers that helps kids practice their brush technique Permanent Mainstay: the dental accoutrements of historic figures, such as Queen Victoria's personal instruments and George Washington's decidedly non-wooden ivory dentures Don't Miss: a tour through the history of toothbrushes that takes visitors back thousands of years via real artifacts
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    31 South Greene Street
    Baltimore, MD US
  • Bromo Seltzer Arts Tower
    Looming 15 stories above the surrounding streets, the Bromo Seltzer Arts Tower has been a landmark in Baltimore ever since it was constructed in 1911. Upon completion, this structure?inspired by the design of the Palazzo Vecchio in Florence, Italy?was the tallest building in the city and served as a symbol of Baltimore's advancement to its creator, the inventor of the titular headache remedy. The Baltimore Office of Promotion & the Arts decided to preserve this proudly progressive legacy by adapting the layout to create studio spaces for more than 30 visual and literary artists hoping to continue their work within a modernized setting. Guests can visit the historical clock tower on Fridays and Saturdays, as well as during lightning storms that will send plucky characters back to 1985. Tours enter the structure's clock room, whose faces feature the words "Bromo-Seltzer" instead of numerals, for peeks at the inner workings and vistas that include Camden Yards. During open-studio hours, visitors also have the opportunity to see the artists' workspaces and view nascent pieces in a variety of media, such as oil painting, photography, sculpture, digital art, and charcoal.
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    21 S Eutaw St
    Baltimore, MD US
  • FanXchange US
    Though modern in its amenities, Oriole Park at Camden Yards thoroughly embraces baseball's past. During a tour of the grounds, groups explore the Orioles' dugout, the press level, and even the control room for the scoreboard and JumboTron, all while noting the early 20th-century architectural influences.
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    333 West Camden St
    Baltimore, MD US
  • Geppi's Entertainment Museum
    Created by Steve Geppi, the founder of Diamond Comic Distributors, Geppi's Entertainment Museum traces the evolution of American popular culture from the late 1700s to today with nearly 6,000 artifacts such as comics, dolls, and games. Along with rotating special exhibitions, the museum's permanent galleries each dedicate themselves to a specific period or medium. Rekindle your flame with favorite cultural characters such as Batman, Mickey Mouse, and Barbie as you place them in historical context via the museum's massive memorabilia-based timeline.
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    301 West Camden Street
    Baltimore, MD US
  • Maryland Historical Society
    Since 1844, Maryland Historical Society has kept residents connected to their state's heritage by publishing educational books and a quarterly magazine. These days, its museum brings that archived history to life with more than 350,000 objects, most notably the oldest-known surviving manuscript of Francis Scott Key's "The Star-Spangled Banner". Guests can also marvel at artifacts ranging from 900 pieces of furniture made between 1634 and 2000 to more than 2,000 paintings, including seven by Joshua Johnson, America's first professional African American portrait painter. Meanwhile, its Civil War exhibit occupies more than 5,000 square feet with 3-D video presentations. The society also sponsors extensive educational programs that enlighten young students with field trips, plus adult programs that include lectures, concerts, and symposia.
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    201 W Monument St
    Baltimore, MD US
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