Nightlife in Battle Ground

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copper top bar, pressed tin ceilings, quiet setting ideal for eating,drinking and conversation. Voted the best brewpub in Washington 3 years in a row. 12 taps of our ales on hand

108 W Evergreen Blvd
Vancouver,
WA
US

Cinetopia's super-high-definition digital projectors, wide leather seats, fresh market-to-table cuisine, selection of local microbrews, extensive wine list, and art gallery have earned the cinema acclaim from multiple media outlets. The Vancouver Mall 23 location boasts four enormous GXL screens up to 80 feet with 4096p projection—4 times the resolution of Blu-ray—and an exclusive immersive 64.2 channel Dolby ATMOS sound system, five luxury-themed movie parlors, nine living rooms, and five grand auditoriums with steep stadium-style seating and ejection buttons that allow audiences to escape the theater during too-scary shower scenes.

The Mill Plain location also houses five grand auditorium theaters, each equipped with 50-foot, 2048p screens. The venue's three living-room theaters accommodate patrons aged 21 and older with footrests, pillows, and waiters on hand. Along with grand auditoriums and living-room theaters, the Beaverton location houses two grand XL theaters with massive 62-foot and 70-foot screens. Films unreel onto super-high-definition, 30-foot screens in the exclusive parlor-room theaters.

Visitors to each Cinetopia can order restaurant service in select screening rooms. They can also customize their popcorn at a gourmet-butter bar, and enjoy preshow live music performed 20 minutes before weekend evening shows, typically by pianists, violinists, and horror-movie villains trying to rebrand their image. Cinetopia also carries a host of other classic comfort food and beverages, such as pastries, made-from-scratch pizzas, and more than 50 wines.

11700 SE 7th St.
Vancouver,
WA
US

It's hard to imagine Vancouver without Kiggins Theatre. Its iconic neon sign has stood outside 1011 Main Street since 1936, with red letters spelling out the name Kiggins. That moniker comes from original owner and former Vancouver mayor J.P. Kiggins, who first envisioned the art-deco theater and its grand auditorium. Today, the single-screen auditorium still flickers to life with independent, classic, and art-house films. Kiggins Theatre has also expanded to host trivia nights and screenings of popular TV shows, as well as poetry readings and other performances.

1011 Main St
Vancouver,
WA
US

Roots owner and chef Brad Root uses seasonal, natural ingredients to prepare tongue-tapping dishes in an upscale dining environment. Split into three courses, the dinner menu harnesses locally harvested farm products to create deceptively simple dishes. Dive into the first course with Dungeness crab and avocado ($11) topped with vermouth vinaigrette, and then spear a baby-spinach salad with egg, bacon, and cider vinaigrette ($6.95). Main courses inducing mouth-clapping include chicken breast ($16.95) with Yukon Gold potato gnocchi and artichokes, a top-sirloin burger ($11.95) with grilled onions and hand-cut fries, and halibut fish and chips ($14.95) with coleslaw. Roots' lunch menu offers tinier tastes of many of the dinner menu's selections, with crispy fried oysters ($10.95) and a local baby-shrimp salad ($11) summoning sustenance from the world-weary waters of the Pacific. At lunch or at dinner, guests can satisfy grape-teeth with a choice from Roots' impressive list of local and California wines, or sip cocktails from the full bar.

19215 SE 34th St
Camas,
WA
US

Dance School Est. in 1972. Currently w/3 locations: Gresham, OR. And Camas/Washougal, WA. And in Stevenson, WA. We teach: ballet, tap, jazz, hip-hop, Mommy & Me, Ballroom, Salsa, Swing & Zumba. We have classes for toddlers thru adults.

921 4th St
Washougal,
WA
US

The light of a projector first hit the Hollywood Theatre's screen in 1926. Since then, this cinema has changed with the times—at various points serving as a Cinerama and a second-run discount movie house. After a near-closure and a nearly 15-year renovation, the building re-emerged as a non-profit, independent cinema. Today, Hollywood Theatre screens about 300 films a year, ranging from classic Hollywood and genre films to newer independent movies and quirky blockbusters.

The core of the theatre's programming, however, is its signature series. Programs such as Kung Fu Theater and Sound + Vision aim to restore classic films' spectacle to the silver screen. Outside the auditorium, Hollywood Theatre hosts educational workshops on topics such as animation, documentary filmmaking, and chiseling your own star onto the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the cinema's Spanish Colonial Revival building retains much of its historic charm. At the top of a curving staircase lies a lounge with plush antique furnishings and signage. Inside the main auditorium—the house's original orchestra level—films blaze to life on a 50-foot screen and a digital surround-sound system. On the theater's original balcony level, two smaller venues with just more than 110 seats provide a more intimate viewing experience.

4122 NE Sandy Blvd
Portland,
OR
US