Museums in West End

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Make one remarkable discovery after another at the Museum of Science! Visit more than 700 interactive exhibits; watch a large-format film in the Mugar Omni Theater, zoom through space in the newly renovated Charles Hayden Planetarium, experience an indoor lightning storm in the Theater of Electricity; and much more!

1 Science Park
Boston,
MA
US

Historic New England focuses its efforts on the preservation of the region's architecture, landscapes, and other histori-cultural entities. Currently, the organization owns and operates 36 historical sites throughout Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampshire, Connecticut, and Rhode Island—20 of which are located in the Bay State. Join Historic New England's time-trapping cause with a contributing membership and you'll receive a Beauport-Sleeper-McCann House’s worth of benefits, including:

141 Cambridge St
Boston,
MA
US

_". . . then and there the child Independence was born."_ ?John Adams, after hearing James Otis argue against the _Writs of Assistance_ at the Old State House in 1761

The Old State House is a history book of a building. Within its walls, American revolutionaries gave birth to a new nation. RevolutionaryBoston?the museum that now occupies the building?tells their stories.


Museum Overview

Tours (Held Every 30 Minutes)

  • Old State House Tour: Relive the first days of the American Revolution
  • Boston Massacre Tour: Learn about the events leading to this tragedy and explore the actual site
  • Daily-Changing Tours: Delve into special topics such as revolutionary women and the politics of fashion

Artifacts

  • John Hancock?s red velvet coat
  • Tea salvaged from the Boston Tea Party
  • Muskets from the Revolutionary War

Other Things to Do

  • Visit the newly-restored 1764 Council Chamber and the Royal Governor?s Chair

Historical Timeline

  • 1713: Old State House is built
  • 1770: The Boston Massacre occurs outside the building
  • 1776:The Declaration of Independence is read from the balcony
  • 1780?1798: It becomes the first Massachusetts State House
  • 1798?1881: A bunch of other stuff happens
  • 1881: The Bostonian Society is founded to preserve the building

Boston's Freedom Trail

The Old State House occupies a spot along Boston's Freedom Trail: Two-and-a-half miles dotted with 16 different historical sites. Follow the brick-lined path to other destinations, such as the USS Constitution in the Boston Navy Yard.

206 Washington Street
Boston,
MA
US

An hour inside BODY WORLDS Vital exhibit can change the way people see themselves in the mirror. Filling the historic Quincy Market with 200 authentic human specimens, including individual organs, transparent slices, and whole bodies, the exhibit reveals our inner workings, from eyes and brains down to feet and toes. These bodies are frozen in time, many taking on athletic poses to emphasize key muscle groups, respiratory systems, and intricate blood vessels. To stay as true to life as possible, every specimen is different: some are healthy, some show damage from disease, and virtually none of them have the ability to shoot fireballs.

This unique insight into the human body is possible thanks to a technique called Plastination. In 1977, Dr. Gunther von Hagen invented the process, which removes skin and replaces degradable cells with hard resins and polymers?allowing every body system to come into view. The Institute for Plastination, the organization behind BODY WORLDS Vital, sources its specimens from more than 13,000 donors.

Faneuil Hall Marketplace

Faneuil Hall is like no other marketplace in America. Originally a meeting place for colonists, the hall's original 18th-century structure was where revolutionaries pushed the message of "no taxation without representation" while protesting the Sugar Act in 1764. This was where Samuel Adams spurred the city to take up the call for independence, and where Daniel Webster delivered the eulogies for John Adams and Thomas Jefferson. Other historic Americans, from Susan B. Anthony to president Bill Clinton, have spoken at Faneuil Hall.

Yet while Faneuil Hall Marketplace has its roots in the past, it has changed over the years. In 1826, it expanded to include Quincy Market, and today it's also home to North Market and South Market. More than 18 million visitors shop at the market each year, making it the 4th-most visited attraction in the United States. There's more to do than shop: you can watch musicians, jugglers, and many other street performers.

1 Faneuil Hall Square
Boston,
MA
US

When fans of the iconic television show Cheers head to the location that inspired it on Beacon Street, sometimes they come away a little disappointed that, other than the façade, it doesn’t look much like Sam and Diane’s bar that they came to love. That’s where Cheers at Faneuil Hall, a replica of the set, comes in. This bustling Cheers show look-a-like recreates the interior of the bar from the iconic program, complete with large cardboard cut-outs of Norm, Cliff and Carla, as well as plenty of other trinkets and memorabilia. The working pub also features a menu of typical favorites like nachos, chicken wings and burgers. Cheers aficionados can even line up at the bar to order beers in take-home souvenir mugs.

4 S Market St.
Boston,
MA
US

The giant screen – 65’ high by 85’ wide – is taller than a six story building! The slight curvature of the screen extends to the edge of your peripheral vision. The lamps that project the crystal clear images onto the gigantic screen get as bright and as hot as the surface of the sun! So hot, in fact, that cold water must b

1 Central Wharf
Boston,
MA
US